Department Course Descriptions

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2003
3 Credit Hours

The accounting cycle for merchandising and service-oriented business organizations. Primary emphasis is on financial accounting principles applicable to measuring assets, liabilities, and owners' equity. ACTS Course Number: ACCT 2003. This course is offered on the Beebe and Searcy campuses and online during the fall and spring semesters, and on the Beebe campus during Summer I.

2013
3 Credit Hours

The first part of this course is an extension of basic financial accounting concepts from Principles of Accounting I, applied to corporate equity structures, long-term debt issues, and cash flows. The second part of the course focuses on managerial and cost accounting concepts, reporting, and decision making. Prerequisite: ACCT 2003 with a grade of “C” or better. ACTS Course Number: ACCT 2013. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall, spring, and Summer II semesters.

2003
3 Credit Hours

The accounting cycle for merchandising and service-oriented business organizations. Primary emphasis is on financial accounting principles applicable to measuring assets, liabilities, and owners' equity. ACTS Course Number: ACCT 2003. This course is offered on the Beebe and Searcy campuses and online during the fall and spring semesters, and on the Beebe campus during Summer I.

2013
3 Credit Hours

The first part of this course is an extension of basic financial accounting concepts from Principles of Accounting I, applied to corporate equity structures, long-term debt issues, and cash flows. The second part of the course focuses on managerial and cost accounting concepts, reporting, and decision making. Prerequisite: ACCT 2003 with a grade of “C” or better. ACTS Course Number: ACCT 2013. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall, spring, and Summer II semesters.

1003
3 Credit Hours

Basic economic principles and their application to agriculture. This course deals briefly with production, distribution, value, price, credit, land value, marketing, and related problems. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters, and it is offered online during Summer 2.

1003
3 Credit Hours

Basic economic principles and their application to agriculture. This course deals briefly with production, distribution, value, price, credit, land value, marketing, and related problems. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters, and it is offered online during Summer 2.

Philosophy, aims, and objectives of agricultural and extension education. Explanation of programs, career opportunities, and qualifications in agricultural and extension education.

Philosophy, aims, and objectives of agricultural and extension education. Explanation of programs, career opportunities, and qualifications in agricultural and extension education.

This course is designed to enhance academic, study and research skills, develop connections between fellow students, instructors, and the university community. Students in this course will develop an understanding of ASU-Beebe academic requirements, policies, procedures, expectations, and support services. This course will explore the world of agriculture, including the majors, career opportunities through experiential and service learning. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

This course is designed to enhance academic, study and research skills, develop connections between fellow students, instructors, and the university community. Students in this course will develop an understanding of ASU-Beebe academic requirements, policies, procedures, expectations, and support services. This course will explore the world of agriculture, including the majors, career opportunities through experiential and service learning. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1046
6 Credit Hours

Offers a supervised work experience needed to make courses taught on campus meaningful and useful. Students will practice the skills and use the knowledge acquired in class and in the lab. Prerequisites: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1003, 1004, 1014, 1023, and 1033. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the summer term.

2014
4 Credit Hours

On-board and off-board diagnostic systems and procedures will be introduced and applied. Controller networking theory and signals will be analyzed. Troubleshooting of transmission and hydraulic control systems using traditional and advanced diagnostic methods will be practiced. Prerequisites: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

The basic electrical system principles-flow, pressures, and resistance-will be studied. These concepts will then be applied to the starting, charging, and accessory systems of typical John Deere electrical systems. Starters, alternators, and various circuit failures will be studied. Electronic components as found on the monitoring and control systems of JD electrical systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1014
4 Credit Hours

The theory, operation and repair procedures for tractor power train systems will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on assembly and adjustment procedures. Basic power train system diagnostics will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2003
3 Credit Hours

Combines, cotton pickers and hay balers, along with various attachments, will be covered during this class. Their function and adjustments as well as repair will be studied. Electrical and hydraulic systems and diagnostic procedures will be emphasized. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1104
4 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the theory and application of precision farming technologies, as well as their diagnosis and repair. Topics include global positioning, equipment automated systems, implement monitoring and electrohydraulic control. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

This course covers the function, adjustment, and repair of various grounds care products marketed by John Deere Company. Walk-behind mowers, riders, lawn and garden tractors, and compact utility tractors will be studied. Included will be adjustment of power trains, hydraulic and electrical systems, and cutting components. Hydrostatic drive systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1023
3 Credit Hours

Basic hydraulic principles-flow, pressure, and restriction (load)-will be covered. These principles will then be applied to John Deere hydraulic systems. Basic hydraulic components-radial piston pumps, external gear pumps, selective control valves, and valve housings on current John Deere equipment-will be assembled and adjusted. Basic hydraulic system diagnostics will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

This course will present the features, applications, and operation of service Advisor software used by service technicians to access information and interface with John Deere equipment. Principles and applications of electrical and hydraulic systems will be reinforced. John Deere certifications in basic hydraulics, basic electrical, and Service Advisor will be administered giving students the opportunity to gain certification in these areas. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004, 1023, and 1046. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2033
3 Credit Hours

The basic diesel engine cycle, components of a typical John Deere engine and their theory of operation will be studied. Failure analysis and repair procedures will be emphasized. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004, 1023, 1033, and 1046. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

This is a course in the operation of John Deere agricultural and shop equipment, including safety, usage of monitors and programming of functions. Diagnostic information and procedures will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2023
3 Credit Hours

See Dealer Internship I. Prerequisites: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1003, 1004, 1014, 1023, 1046, and 2014. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1003
3 Credit Hours

The basics of air conditioning will be studied and repair and diagnostic procedures practiced. Cooling, heating, and filtering systems, both R-12 and R134A, will be studied and repair procedures practiced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor and JDAT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1046
6 Credit Hours

Offers a supervised work experience needed to make courses taught on campus meaningful and useful. Students will practice the skills and use the knowledge acquired in class and in the lab. Prerequisites: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1003, 1004, 1014, 1023, and 1033. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the summer term.

2014
4 Credit Hours

On-board and off-board diagnostic systems and procedures will be introduced and applied. Controller networking theory and signals will be analyzed. Troubleshooting of transmission and hydraulic control systems using traditional and advanced diagnostic methods will be practiced. Prerequisites: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

The basic electrical system principles-flow, pressures, and resistance-will be studied. These concepts will then be applied to the starting, charging, and accessory systems of typical John Deere electrical systems. Starters, alternators, and various circuit failures will be studied. Electronic components as found on the monitoring and control systems of JD electrical systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1014
4 Credit Hours

The theory, operation and repair procedures for tractor power train systems will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on assembly and adjustment procedures. Basic power train system diagnostics will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2003
3 Credit Hours

Combines, cotton pickers and hay balers, along with various attachments, will be covered during this class. Their function and adjustments as well as repair will be studied. Electrical and hydraulic systems and diagnostic procedures will be emphasized. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1104
4 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the theory and application of precision farming technologies, as well as their diagnosis and repair. Topics include global positioning, equipment automated systems, implement monitoring and electrohydraulic control. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

This course covers the function, adjustment, and repair of various grounds care products marketed by John Deere Company. Walk-behind mowers, riders, lawn and garden tractors, and compact utility tractors will be studied. Included will be adjustment of power trains, hydraulic and electrical systems, and cutting components. Hydrostatic drive systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004 and 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1023
3 Credit Hours

Basic hydraulic principles-flow, pressure, and restriction (load)-will be covered. These principles will then be applied to John Deere hydraulic systems. Basic hydraulic components-radial piston pumps, external gear pumps, selective control valves, and valve housings on current John Deere equipment-will be assembled and adjusted. Basic hydraulic system diagnostics will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

This course will present the features, applications, and operation of service Advisor software used by service technicians to access information and interface with John Deere equipment. Principles and applications of electrical and hydraulic systems will be reinforced. John Deere certifications in basic hydraulics, basic electrical, and Service Advisor will be administered giving students the opportunity to gain certification in these areas. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004, 1023, and 1046. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2033
3 Credit Hours

The basic diesel engine cycle, components of a typical John Deere engine and their theory of operation will be studied. Failure analysis and repair procedures will be emphasized. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1004, 1023, 1033, and 1046. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

This is a course in the operation of John Deere agricultural and shop equipment, including safety, usage of monitors and programming of functions. Diagnostic information and procedures will be introduced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2023
3 Credit Hours

See Dealer Internship I. Prerequisites: John Deere dealer sponsor, JDAT 1003, 1004, 1014, 1023, 1046, and 2014. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1003
3 Credit Hours

The basics of air conditioning will be studied and repair and diagnostic procedures practiced. Cooling, heating, and filtering systems, both R-12 and R134A, will be studied and repair procedures practiced. Prerequisite: John Deere dealer sponsor and JDAT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2102
2 Credit Hours

This course covers the properties of air, air circulation, indoor air quality, ventilation requirements and air measurement. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

This course covers the complete wiring diagram, electrical circuits in depth, control systems consisting of relays, contacts, circuit boards, pressure switches and troubleshooting. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

This course is a comprehensive study of mechanical refrigeration cycles emphasizing proper service techniques. Testing procedures, parts removal, and installation are covered. The use of vacuum pumps and recovery equipment is taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course covers electric motor applications, motor structure, and types of electric motors, motor components and servicing electric motors. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course covers the types of fuels, combustion process, furnace components, efficiency, venting and maintenance of gas heating systems. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

This course is a study of the major components and control devices for the cooling systems. Identification and use of refrigerants is taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2204
4 Credit Hours

This course covers the process of identifying tubing and pipe and fittings. Soft soldering, silver soldering, identification of tools, and the history of air conditioning are taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2102
2 Credit Hours

This course covers the properties of air, air circulation, indoor air quality, ventilation requirements and air measurement. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

This course covers the complete wiring diagram, electrical circuits in depth, control systems consisting of relays, contacts, circuit boards, pressure switches and troubleshooting. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

This course is a comprehensive study of mechanical refrigeration cycles emphasizing proper service techniques. Testing procedures, parts removal, and installation are covered. The use of vacuum pumps and recovery equipment is taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course covers electric motor applications, motor structure, and types of electric motors, motor components and servicing electric motors. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course covers the types of fuels, combustion process, furnace components, efficiency, venting and maintenance of gas heating systems. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

This course is a study of the major components and control devices for the cooling systems. Identification and use of refrigerants is taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2204
4 Credit Hours

This course covers the process of identifying tubing and pipe and fittings. Soft soldering, silver soldering, identification of tools, and the history of air conditioning are taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory as needed. This class will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2213
3 Credit Hours

Principles of animal nutrition, composition, and digestibility of feeds, balanced rations and feed of farm animals. Prerequisite: ANSC 1204. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2623
3 Credit Hours

Course covers aspects of equine health, diseases, soundness, first aid, preventive maintenance, and management of horses in domestic situations. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

A course dealing with fundamental principles of successful livestock farming in Arkansas and the United States. It includes a study of the types, breeds, and economic importance of beef cattle, swine, dairy cattle, sheep, and horses. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours per week. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2213
3 Credit Hours

Principles of animal nutrition, composition, and digestibility of feeds, balanced rations and feed of farm animals. Prerequisite: ANSC 1204. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2623
3 Credit Hours

Course covers aspects of equine health, diseases, soundness, first aid, preventive maintenance, and management of horses in domestic situations. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

A course dealing with fundamental principles of successful livestock farming in Arkansas and the United States. It includes a study of the types, breeds, and economic importance of beef cattle, swine, dairy cattle, sheep, and horses. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours per week. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

The study of the elements and principles of two-dimensional design. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1063
3 Credit Hours

This course offers an introduction to photography as it can be used in digital media. Basic camera operation and computer based digital imaging and design applications will be covered. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1093
3 Credit Hours

This course offers a continuation of Digital Photography I. The students will become more independent in their use of advanced photography skills including but not limited to composition, camera control, and the use of editing programs. This class will push students toward greater challenges both technically and aesthetically. Students will continue to use creative solutions to solve a series of design problems. Prerequisite: Digital Photography I.

1083
3 Credit Hours

Basic principles of typography, printing processes, design and visual communication as they relate to graphic design. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2433
3 Credit Hours

Application of principles of typography, page layout, color, texture, organization, photography, and illustration imagery and concept using the editorial magazine as the vehicle; further mastery of Adobe Creative Suite; further understanding of both historic and contemporary graphic design and designer’s styles; preparation for final portfolio; job hunting skills; venues; resume and cover letters; identity package and self-promotion; improve presentation and critique skills.

2103
3 Credit Hours

Continuation of Introduction to Ceramics work. Emphasis is placed upon sculpture, slab, and wheel thrown pot methods along with glazing and firing procedures. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 2093. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2063
3 Credit Hours

A studio course which utilizes the elements and principles of art. In addition to the language of art, value studies, contrast, and technique will be taught. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 1033. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1043
3 Credit Hours

Foundation course for majors or minors in art. Studies of the figure with emphasis on anatomy, composition, and orientation to media. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 1033. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2093
3 Credit Hours

An introductory course in creative clay processes. Emphasis is placed upon the hand building techniques of coil, slab, pinch, and wheel thrown pot methods along with glazing and firing procedures. Surface and glaze treatments are explored for visual as well as tactile purposes. Six hours per week. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2603
3 Credit Hours

This course will examine the origins and development of modern art, including painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the time of Manet in the late nineteenth century through the twentieth century. Its purpose is to help the student gain an understanding of some of the major ideas behind the development of modernism and of the characteristic forms of various art movements and to acquaint the student with some of the important artistic figures who played a significant role in these developments. This is a history course which is concerned with the evolution and interrelation of ideas about art, history, artists, and visual facts and their application to emerging art forms examined within their cultural-historical context. This course is intended to develop critical thinking and communication skills as well as knowledge of the subject matter. This course is offered online during the fall semester.

2423
3 Credit Hours

Graphic Design demands the visual representation of concepts of ideas. In this advanced, hands-on course, you'll build creative skills for tackling challenging professional projects. The main focus of this class will be on creating 2D digital design projects and developing portfolio pieces.

2503
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to visual arts for all students regardless of background or experience. The purpose is to help the student to develop criteria for appreciation of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Three lecture hours per week. ACTS Course Number: ARTA 1003. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

1053
3 Credit Hours

Surveys the field of graphic design from its origins to contemporary practice. Develops visual vocabulary, provides insight into the continuity of design thinking, provides cultural and historical context for design practice. This course is offered online during the spring semester.

1073
3 Credit Hours

A concentrated study of the theory and application of color, both fundamental and advanced. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2413
3 Credit Hours

Graphic Design II is a continuation of Graphic Design I and more fully explores the interaction of text and image. Students will become more independent in the use of fundamental components of graphic communication. Students will create independent and creative solutions to a series of design problems. Knowledge of and exposure to contemporary design issues and graphic design history will be an important component to this course. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2073
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of ART 2063. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 2063. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1033
3 Credit Hours

A studio course in which the concepts of linear perspective, value studies, contrast, contour, and technique are taught by using a variety of subjects from still life to live models. A variety of media will also be explored. Six hours per week. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1013
3 Credit Hours

The study of the elements and principles of two-dimensional design. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1063
3 Credit Hours

This course offers an introduction to photography as it can be used in digital media. Basic camera operation and computer based digital imaging and design applications will be covered. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1093
3 Credit Hours

This course offers a continuation of Digital Photography I. The students will become more independent in their use of advanced photography skills including but not limited to composition, camera control, and the use of editing programs. This class will push students toward greater challenges both technically and aesthetically. Students will continue to use creative solutions to solve a series of design problems. Prerequisite: Digital Photography I.

1083
3 Credit Hours

Basic principles of typography, printing processes, design and visual communication as they relate to graphic design. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2433
3 Credit Hours

Application of principles of typography, page layout, color, texture, organization, photography, and illustration imagery and concept using the editorial magazine as the vehicle; further mastery of Adobe Creative Suite; further understanding of both historic and contemporary graphic design and designer’s styles; preparation for final portfolio; job hunting skills; venues; resume and cover letters; identity package and self-promotion; improve presentation and critique skills.

2103
3 Credit Hours

Continuation of Introduction to Ceramics work. Emphasis is placed upon sculpture, slab, and wheel thrown pot methods along with glazing and firing procedures. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 2093. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2063
3 Credit Hours

A studio course which utilizes the elements and principles of art. In addition to the language of art, value studies, contrast, and technique will be taught. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 1033. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1043
3 Credit Hours

Foundation course for majors or minors in art. Studies of the figure with emphasis on anatomy, composition, and orientation to media. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 1033. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2093
3 Credit Hours

An introductory course in creative clay processes. Emphasis is placed upon the hand building techniques of coil, slab, pinch, and wheel thrown pot methods along with glazing and firing procedures. Surface and glaze treatments are explored for visual as well as tactile purposes. Six hours per week. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2603
3 Credit Hours

This course will examine the origins and development of modern art, including painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the time of Manet in the late nineteenth century through the twentieth century. Its purpose is to help the student gain an understanding of some of the major ideas behind the development of modernism and of the characteristic forms of various art movements and to acquaint the student with some of the important artistic figures who played a significant role in these developments. This is a history course which is concerned with the evolution and interrelation of ideas about art, history, artists, and visual facts and their application to emerging art forms examined within their cultural-historical context. This course is intended to develop critical thinking and communication skills as well as knowledge of the subject matter. This course is offered online during the fall semester.

2423
3 Credit Hours

Graphic Design demands the visual representation of concepts of ideas. In this advanced, hands-on course, you'll build creative skills for tackling challenging professional projects. The main focus of this class will be on creating 2D digital design projects and developing portfolio pieces.

2503
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to visual arts for all students regardless of background or experience. The purpose is to help the student to develop criteria for appreciation of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Three lecture hours per week. ACTS Course Number: ARTA 1003. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

1053
3 Credit Hours

Surveys the field of graphic design from its origins to contemporary practice. Develops visual vocabulary, provides insight into the continuity of design thinking, provides cultural and historical context for design practice. This course is offered online during the spring semester.

1073
3 Credit Hours

A concentrated study of the theory and application of color, both fundamental and advanced. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2413
3 Credit Hours

Graphic Design II is a continuation of Graphic Design I and more fully explores the interaction of text and image. Students will become more independent in the use of fundamental components of graphic communication. Students will create independent and creative solutions to a series of design problems. Knowledge of and exposure to contemporary design issues and graphic design history will be an important component to this course. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2073
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of ART 2063. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 2063. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1033
3 Credit Hours

A studio course in which the concepts of linear perspective, value studies, contrast, contour, and technique are taught by using a variety of subjects from still life to live models. A variety of media will also be explored. Six hours per week. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1113
3 Credit Hours

This course will cover the introduction to vehicle body panels and tools used in panel straightening. It will also include the procedures necessary for mixing application of body fillers, proper sanding techniques, and welding. This class will be approximately 1/4 theory in the classroom and 3/4 lab. Safety is an integral part of this course. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2303
3 Credit Hours

The identification, preparation, use, and repair of special automotive body materials such as plastics, fiberglass, and automotive glass will be covered in this course. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. Related safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

The skills needed to prepare automotive bodies for refinishing will be taught in this course. Straightening, sanding, and other steps in preparing for refinishing will be taught and practiced. This course will be 1/4 theory and ¾ lab. Related safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2113
3 Credit Hours

Priming, painting, buffing, and polishing automotive body surfaces will be taught in this course. This course will be 1/4 theory and 3/4 lab. Related safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1303
3 Credit Hours

The straightening, alignment, and fitting of major panels are taught in this course. Procedures necessary to rough, shrink, bump, and finish will also be taught. Safety is an integral part of this course. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

Determining repairs needed to damaged vehicles will be taught in this course as well as estimating cost related to the repair of these damages. Repairs to paint, frames, accessories, and safety equipment will be covered. Students will actually work on damaged parts to become familiar with the time needed for repairs. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2103
3 Credit Hours

Students will be taught needed skills related to minor repair of automotive mechanical parts. Included in these will be climate control, steering, cooling systems, lighting, and others. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

The students will receive instruction in the use of frame equipment and frame construction, sectioning, and straightening. Experience working with unitized construction using frame alignment equipment will be provided. The fundamentals of welding, heating, cutting, and shaping are included. This course will be approximately 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1113
3 Credit Hours

This course will cover the introduction to vehicle body panels and tools used in panel straightening. It will also include the procedures necessary for mixing application of body fillers, proper sanding techniques, and welding. This class will be approximately 1/4 theory in the classroom and 3/4 lab. Safety is an integral part of this course. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2303
3 Credit Hours

The identification, preparation, use, and repair of special automotive body materials such as plastics, fiberglass, and automotive glass will be covered in this course. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. Related safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

The skills needed to prepare automotive bodies for refinishing will be taught in this course. Straightening, sanding, and other steps in preparing for refinishing will be taught and practiced. This course will be 1/4 theory and ¾ lab. Related safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2113
3 Credit Hours

Priming, painting, buffing, and polishing automotive body surfaces will be taught in this course. This course will be 1/4 theory and 3/4 lab. Related safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1303
3 Credit Hours

The straightening, alignment, and fitting of major panels are taught in this course. Procedures necessary to rough, shrink, bump, and finish will also be taught. Safety is an integral part of this course. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

Determining repairs needed to damaged vehicles will be taught in this course as well as estimating cost related to the repair of these damages. Repairs to paint, frames, accessories, and safety equipment will be covered. Students will actually work on damaged parts to become familiar with the time needed for repairs. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2103
3 Credit Hours

Students will be taught needed skills related to minor repair of automotive mechanical parts. Included in these will be climate control, steering, cooling systems, lighting, and others. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

The students will receive instruction in the use of frame equipment and frame construction, sectioning, and straightening. Experience working with unitized construction using frame alignment equipment will be provided. The fundamentals of welding, heating, cutting, and shaping are included. This course will be approximately 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2703
3 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the theory governing refrigeration, the law of Thermodynamics, the refrigeration cycle and the components that make up the basic air conditioning system, plus the proper, safe method of handling refrigerants is taught. The student will learn the functions of the compressor, condenser, receiver-drier, accumulator, evaporator, various metering devices and the lines connecting these components. The student will gain the ability to properly diagnose, repair and service the entire system. Knowledge of vacuum and electrical control devices and how to diagnose problems in these areas is also gained. This course will be ½ theory and ½ lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall Semester.

This course will include the study of fuel systems, electronic engine/emission controls, proper engine performance, tune-up, and automotive safety devices and how the clutches, bands, servos, solenoids, pump, valve body and modulator work. Diagnostics will be extensively covered. Also, the laws governing planetary gears are studied. The operating characteristics of this type of gear set will allow the student to understand how torque is routed through an automatic transmission. Learning about the relationship of hydraulic components and planetary control devices will help the student to properly diagnose problems in the transmission. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 100% lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus.

2122
2 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the proper selection, use, and care of hand tools, and of tools specially designed for automotive repair and about wheels, hubs, tires, their design and construction. The student will learn, in depth, the use and care of precision tools, with a focus on micrometers. Proper safety is also taught. Instruction in basic electricity and meter reading is taught. The student will learn the designs and functions of the various types of wheel bearings and how to diagnose problems associated with wheel bearings. Hydraulic and mechanical components and how they operate in the brake systems are taught. Hands-on-training in turning drum and disc brakes is learned. The student will gain a working knowledge of both power assist and anti-lock brake systems. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. The design and construction of automotive frames and front and rear suspensions plus the unique characteristics of each type of suspension system will be highlighted. The various types of manual and power steering systems used in the modern automobile plus the difference between the parallelogram steering systems and the rack and pinion steering system are taught. The student will learn the theory of wheel alignment angles that allow the automobile’s suspension, tires, wheels and steering systems to work together in harmony. In addition, the correct procedures required to set wheel alignment in an automobile will be taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 100% lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus.

In this course of study, the student will be introduced to the fundamentals of transportation electrical systems and learn the theory governing refrigeration, the law of Thermodynamics, the refrigeration cycle and the components that make up the basic air conditioning system, plus the proper, safe method of handling refrigerants is taught The student will learn what electricity is, how it functions, and its relation to atomic structure. The student is taught the practical application of Ohm’s Law, Watt’s Law, wiring schematics and the use of simple electrical and electronic diagnostic tools. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. The student will learn the functions of the compressor, condenser, receiver-drier, accumulator, evaporator, various metering devices and the lines connecting these components. The student will gain the ability to properly diagnose, repair and service the entire system. Knowledge of vacuum and electrical control devices and how to diagnose problems in these areas is also gained. This course will be 100% lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus.

2802
2 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the theory and operation of the internal combustion gasoline engine. Instruction will be given on the different classifications and measurements involved in gasoline engines. The student will have a clear understanding of cooling and lubrication systems, and will also know how the engine block is constructed and the reasons for multiple cylinders. A thorough understanding is gained of the relationship between the friction bearing, crankshaft, connecting rods, pistons and piston rings for the lower end of the engine. In addition, knowledge of the relationship between valve lifters, cylinder heads and valves of the upper end of the engine is gained. The student will be able to properly inspect, clean, measure, service and repair all the various components of the engine upon completion of this course. In addition, the student will learn the value of a correct complete work order as well as learning the proper procedures involved with engine inspection and diagnosis. Different types of gaskets, seals and sealants used in today’s engine repair are taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 100% lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus.

In this course of study, the student will be introduced to the fundamentals of transportation electrical systems. The student will learn what electricity is, how it functions, and its relation to atomic structure. The student is taught the practical application of Ohm’s Law, Watt’s Law, wiring schematics and the use of simple electrical and electronic diagnostic tools. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2403
3 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the components and power flow of both the manual transmission and transaxle. The student will gain the ability to inspect, diagnose problems, service, disassemble, repair and test the transmission and transaxles. Also, the student will be able to identify the components of the clutch and understand how they function in relation to each other. Drive lines and U-joints of both front engines, rear wheel drive and transaxles drive trains are taught. The different types of U-joints, CV-joints and differentials are covered. The student will gain the ability to check, service, diagnose problems and repair all this equipment. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1203
3 Credit Hours

In this course the student will learn how the clutches, bands, servos, solenoids, pump, valve body and modulator work. Also, the laws governing planetary gears are studied. The operating characteristics of this type of gear set will allow the student to understand how torque is routed through an automatic transmission. Learning about the relationship of hydraulic components and planetary control devices will help the student to properly diagnose problems in the transmission. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2203
3 Credit Hours

During this course, the student will learn about wheels, hubs, tires, their design and construction. The design and construction of automotive frames and front and rear suspensions plus the unique characteristics of each type of suspension system will be highlighted. The various types of manual and power steering systems used in the modern automobile plus the difference between the parallelogram steering systems and the rack and pinion steering system are taught. The student will learn the theory of wheel alignment angles that allow the automobile’s suspension, tires, wheels and steering systems to work together in harmony. In addition, the correct procedures required to set wheel alignment in an automobile will be taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

During this course of study the student will learn the components and power flow of both the manual transmission and transaxle. The student will gain the ability to inspect, diagnose problems, service, disassemble, repair and test the transmission and transaxles. Also, the student will be able to identify the components of the clutch and understand how they function in relation to each other. Drivelines and U joints of both front wheel and rear wheel drive trains are taught. The different types of u-joints, CV-joints and differentials are covered. The student will gain the ability to check, service, diagnose problems and repair all this equipment. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will 100% lab. Safety is emphasized.

Basic shop safety will be extensively covered in this course. Students will become familiar with tools used in automotive repair and diagnostic equipment for automobiles. The basic principles and history of the internal combustion engine will be studied extensively. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2603
3 Credit Hours

This course will include the study of fuel systems, electronic engine/emission controls, proper engine performance, tune-up, and automotive safety devices. Engine repair will be extensively covered. This course will be ½ theory and ½ lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall Semester.

2503
3 Credit Hours

This course will include the study of fuel systems, electronic engine/emission controls, proper engine performance, tune-up, and automotive safety devices. Diagnostics will be extensively covered. This course will be ½ theory and ½ lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall Semester.

2103
3 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the proper selection, use, and care of hand tools, and of tools specially designed for automotive repair. The student will learn, in depth, the use and care of precision tools, with a focus on micrometers. Proper safety is also taught. Instruction in basic electricity and meter reading is taught. The student will learn the designs and functions of the various types of wheel bearings and how to diagnose problems associated with wheel bearings. Hydraulic and mechanical components and how they operate in the brake systems are taught. Hands-on-training in turning drum and disc brakes is learned. The student will gain a working knowledge of both power assist and anti-lock brake systems. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/ 2 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2803
3 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the theory and operation of the internal combustion gasoline engine. Instruction will be given on the different classifications and measurements involved in gasoline engines. The student will have a clear understanding of cooling and lubrication systems, and will also know how the engine block is constructed and the reasons for multiple cylinders. A thorough understanding is gained of the relationship between the friction bearing, crankshaft, connecting rods, pistons and piston rings for the lower end of the engine. In addition, knowledge of the relationship between valve lifters, cylinder heads and valves of the upper end of the engine is gained. The student will be able to properly inspect, clean, measure, service and repair all the various components of the engine upon completion of this course. In addition, the student will learn the value of a correct complete work order as well as learning the proper procedures involved with engine inspection and diagnosis. Different types of gaskets, seals and sealants used in today’s engine repair are taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be ½ theory and ½ lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall Semester.

2703
3 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the theory governing refrigeration, the law of Thermodynamics, the refrigeration cycle and the components that make up the basic air conditioning system, plus the proper, safe method of handling refrigerants is taught. The student will learn the functions of the compressor, condenser, receiver-drier, accumulator, evaporator, various metering devices and the lines connecting these components. The student will gain the ability to properly diagnose, repair and service the entire system. Knowledge of vacuum and electrical control devices and how to diagnose problems in these areas is also gained. This course will be ½ theory and ½ lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall Semester.

This course will include the study of fuel systems, electronic engine/emission controls, proper engine performance, tune-up, and automotive safety devices and how the clutches, bands, servos, solenoids, pump, valve body and modulator work. Diagnostics will be extensively covered. Also, the laws governing planetary gears are studied. The operating characteristics of this type of gear set will allow the student to understand how torque is routed through an automatic transmission. Learning about the relationship of hydraulic components and planetary control devices will help the student to properly diagnose problems in the transmission. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 100% lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus.

2122
2 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the proper selection, use, and care of hand tools, and of tools specially designed for automotive repair and about wheels, hubs, tires, their design and construction. The student will learn, in depth, the use and care of precision tools, with a focus on micrometers. Proper safety is also taught. Instruction in basic electricity and meter reading is taught. The student will learn the designs and functions of the various types of wheel bearings and how to diagnose problems associated with wheel bearings. Hydraulic and mechanical components and how they operate in the brake systems are taught. Hands-on-training in turning drum and disc brakes is learned. The student will gain a working knowledge of both power assist and anti-lock brake systems. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. The design and construction of automotive frames and front and rear suspensions plus the unique characteristics of each type of suspension system will be highlighted. The various types of manual and power steering systems used in the modern automobile plus the difference between the parallelogram steering systems and the rack and pinion steering system are taught. The student will learn the theory of wheel alignment angles that allow the automobile’s suspension, tires, wheels and steering systems to work together in harmony. In addition, the correct procedures required to set wheel alignment in an automobile will be taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 100% lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus.

In this course of study, the student will be introduced to the fundamentals of transportation electrical systems and learn the theory governing refrigeration, the law of Thermodynamics, the refrigeration cycle and the components that make up the basic air conditioning system, plus the proper, safe method of handling refrigerants is taught The student will learn what electricity is, how it functions, and its relation to atomic structure. The student is taught the practical application of Ohm’s Law, Watt’s Law, wiring schematics and the use of simple electrical and electronic diagnostic tools. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. The student will learn the functions of the compressor, condenser, receiver-drier, accumulator, evaporator, various metering devices and the lines connecting these components. The student will gain the ability to properly diagnose, repair and service the entire system. Knowledge of vacuum and electrical control devices and how to diagnose problems in these areas is also gained. This course will be 100% lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus.

2802
2 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the theory and operation of the internal combustion gasoline engine. Instruction will be given on the different classifications and measurements involved in gasoline engines. The student will have a clear understanding of cooling and lubrication systems, and will also know how the engine block is constructed and the reasons for multiple cylinders. A thorough understanding is gained of the relationship between the friction bearing, crankshaft, connecting rods, pistons and piston rings for the lower end of the engine. In addition, knowledge of the relationship between valve lifters, cylinder heads and valves of the upper end of the engine is gained. The student will be able to properly inspect, clean, measure, service and repair all the various components of the engine upon completion of this course. In addition, the student will learn the value of a correct complete work order as well as learning the proper procedures involved with engine inspection and diagnosis. Different types of gaskets, seals and sealants used in today’s engine repair are taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 100% lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus.

In this course of study, the student will be introduced to the fundamentals of transportation electrical systems. The student will learn what electricity is, how it functions, and its relation to atomic structure. The student is taught the practical application of Ohm’s Law, Watt’s Law, wiring schematics and the use of simple electrical and electronic diagnostic tools. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2403
3 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the components and power flow of both the manual transmission and transaxle. The student will gain the ability to inspect, diagnose problems, service, disassemble, repair and test the transmission and transaxles. Also, the student will be able to identify the components of the clutch and understand how they function in relation to each other. Drive lines and U-joints of both front engines, rear wheel drive and transaxles drive trains are taught. The different types of U-joints, CV-joints and differentials are covered. The student will gain the ability to check, service, diagnose problems and repair all this equipment. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1203
3 Credit Hours

In this course the student will learn how the clutches, bands, servos, solenoids, pump, valve body and modulator work. Also, the laws governing planetary gears are studied. The operating characteristics of this type of gear set will allow the student to understand how torque is routed through an automatic transmission. Learning about the relationship of hydraulic components and planetary control devices will help the student to properly diagnose problems in the transmission. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2203
3 Credit Hours

During this course, the student will learn about wheels, hubs, tires, their design and construction. The design and construction of automotive frames and front and rear suspensions plus the unique characteristics of each type of suspension system will be highlighted. The various types of manual and power steering systems used in the modern automobile plus the difference between the parallelogram steering systems and the rack and pinion steering system are taught. The student will learn the theory of wheel alignment angles that allow the automobile’s suspension, tires, wheels and steering systems to work together in harmony. In addition, the correct procedures required to set wheel alignment in an automobile will be taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

During this course of study the student will learn the components and power flow of both the manual transmission and transaxle. The student will gain the ability to inspect, diagnose problems, service, disassemble, repair and test the transmission and transaxles. Also, the student will be able to identify the components of the clutch and understand how they function in relation to each other. Drivelines and U joints of both front wheel and rear wheel drive trains are taught. The different types of u-joints, CV-joints and differentials are covered. The student will gain the ability to check, service, diagnose problems and repair all this equipment. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will 100% lab. Safety is emphasized.

Basic shop safety will be extensively covered in this course. Students will become familiar with tools used in automotive repair and diagnostic equipment for automobiles. The basic principles and history of the internal combustion engine will be studied extensively. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/2 lab. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2603
3 Credit Hours

This course will include the study of fuel systems, electronic engine/emission controls, proper engine performance, tune-up, and automotive safety devices. Engine repair will be extensively covered. This course will be ½ theory and ½ lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall Semester.

2503
3 Credit Hours

This course will include the study of fuel systems, electronic engine/emission controls, proper engine performance, tune-up, and automotive safety devices. Diagnostics will be extensively covered. This course will be ½ theory and ½ lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall Semester.

2103
3 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the proper selection, use, and care of hand tools, and of tools specially designed for automotive repair. The student will learn, in depth, the use and care of precision tools, with a focus on micrometers. Proper safety is also taught. Instruction in basic electricity and meter reading is taught. The student will learn the designs and functions of the various types of wheel bearings and how to diagnose problems associated with wheel bearings. Hydraulic and mechanical components and how they operate in the brake systems are taught. Hands-on-training in turning drum and disc brakes is learned. The student will gain a working knowledge of both power assist and anti-lock brake systems. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be 1/2 theory and 1/ 2 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2803
3 Credit Hours

During this course of study the student will learn the theory and operation of the internal combustion gasoline engine. Instruction will be given on the different classifications and measurements involved in gasoline engines. The student will have a clear understanding of cooling and lubrication systems, and will also know how the engine block is constructed and the reasons for multiple cylinders. A thorough understanding is gained of the relationship between the friction bearing, crankshaft, connecting rods, pistons and piston rings for the lower end of the engine. In addition, knowledge of the relationship between valve lifters, cylinder heads and valves of the upper end of the engine is gained. The student will be able to properly inspect, clean, measure, service and repair all the various components of the engine upon completion of this course. In addition, the student will learn the value of a correct complete work order as well as learning the proper procedures involved with engine inspection and diagnosis. Different types of gaskets, seals and sealants used in today’s engine repair are taught. Practical application is provided in the laboratory. This course will be ½ theory and ½ lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall Semester.

2013
3 Credit Hours

A study of human nutritional needs over the human life span. Individual nutrients, their nature, functions, and their processing by the human body. Dietary analyses and evaluations. Food labels and their interpretation, weight control, exercise, food safety, relationships of nutrition to health and the environment. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall and spring semesters.

1013
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed for students who desire to apply nutrition knowledge to their own personal lives. Areas of particular emphasis include the role of nutrition in our health, designing a healthful diet, achieving and maintaining a healthful body weight, and physical activity. Providing hands on, in-class food preparation demonstrations, shopping tips, cooking tips, tips for eating out, etc., students are equipped with necessary tools for successfully planning a healthy diet. Demonstrating how nutrition relates to our bodies, our health, our weight, our success in sports and other activities, this course empowers students to reach their personal health and fitness goals. Designed with non-health care majors in mind. (This course is not intended to replace BIOL 2013 Nutrition that is required for certain majors.)

1024
4 Credit Hours

This course will provide a broad survey of the fundamental concepts and principles that stem from the “Ecosystem Theory” within biology. This will include the basic principles of organismal, population, interspecific, and community ecology; biogeography; speciation; biomes; food webs; and biogeochemical cycles. This course is offered online during the fall semester.

2023
3 Credit Hours

A course designed for kinesiology majors, athletic training majors, and students seeking a coaching endorsement. This course is a directed study of human anatomy with its adaptations to biomechanical principles. In-depth study of the skeletal and articulation system, the muscular and nervous systems, and other key anatomical structures and functions are the course focus. Lecture and use of laboratory exercises including bone, articulation, and muscular models are expected for student learning. Prerequisite: BIOL 1004 or BIOL 1014 with a grade of C or higher.

1014
4 Credit Hours

Provide an in-depth study of the similarity and diversity of life on earth. This course is designed to give students the necessary background for further courses in BIOL, BOT and ZOOL. Prerequisite: ACT Reading score of 19 or better (or equivalent) or successful completion of Freshman English I. ACTS Course Number: BIOL 1104. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours per week.

2104
4 Credit Hours

A study of microorganisms, in particular bacteria, involving their structure and function at the molecular level, and interaction of these organisms with humans and their environment. Prerequisite: BIOL 1014 with a grade of C or better. Knowledge of basic chemistry strongly recommended. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. ACTS Course Number: BIOL 2004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1004
4 Credit Hours

Provide a study of the similarity and diversity of life on earth. This course is designed for non-majors and will not count as the prerequisite for any other BIOL, BOT or ZOOL course. ACTS Course Number: BIOL 1004. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours per week.

2013
3 Credit Hours

A study of human nutritional needs over the human life span. Individual nutrients, their nature, functions, and their processing by the human body. Dietary analyses and evaluations. Food labels and their interpretation, weight control, exercise, food safety, relationships of nutrition to health and the environment. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall and spring semesters.

1013
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed for students who desire to apply nutrition knowledge to their own personal lives. Areas of particular emphasis include the role of nutrition in our health, designing a healthful diet, achieving and maintaining a healthful body weight, and physical activity. Providing hands on, in-class food preparation demonstrations, shopping tips, cooking tips, tips for eating out, etc., students are equipped with necessary tools for successfully planning a healthy diet. Demonstrating how nutrition relates to our bodies, our health, our weight, our success in sports and other activities, this course empowers students to reach their personal health and fitness goals. Designed with non-health care majors in mind. (This course is not intended to replace BIOL 2013 Nutrition that is required for certain majors.)

1024
4 Credit Hours

This course will provide a broad survey of the fundamental concepts and principles that stem from the “Ecosystem Theory” within biology. This will include the basic principles of organismal, population, interspecific, and community ecology; biogeography; speciation; biomes; food webs; and biogeochemical cycles. This course is offered online during the fall semester.

2023
3 Credit Hours

A course designed for kinesiology majors, athletic training majors, and students seeking a coaching endorsement. This course is a directed study of human anatomy with its adaptations to biomechanical principles. In-depth study of the skeletal and articulation system, the muscular and nervous systems, and other key anatomical structures and functions are the course focus. Lecture and use of laboratory exercises including bone, articulation, and muscular models are expected for student learning. Prerequisite: BIOL 1004 or BIOL 1014 with a grade of C or higher.

1014
4 Credit Hours

Provide an in-depth study of the similarity and diversity of life on earth. This course is designed to give students the necessary background for further courses in BIOL, BOT and ZOOL. Prerequisite: ACT Reading score of 19 or better (or equivalent) or successful completion of Freshman English I. ACTS Course Number: BIOL 1104. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours per week.

2104
4 Credit Hours

A study of microorganisms, in particular bacteria, involving their structure and function at the molecular level, and interaction of these organisms with humans and their environment. Prerequisite: BIOL 1014 with a grade of C or better. Knowledge of basic chemistry strongly recommended. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. ACTS Course Number: BIOL 2004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1004
4 Credit Hours

Provide a study of the similarity and diversity of life on earth. This course is designed for non-majors and will not count as the prerequisite for any other BIOL, BOT or ZOOL course. ACTS Course Number: BIOL 1004. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours per week.

1104
4 Credit Hours

A study of selected aspects of the anatomy, morphology, ecology, and physiology of plants. An overview of the life cycles, evolution, and diversity of Achaea, Bacteria, Protista, Fungi, and Plantae. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 1014 with a grade of C or better. ACTS Course Number: BIOL 1034. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1104
4 Credit Hours

A study of selected aspects of the anatomy, morphology, ecology, and physiology of plants. An overview of the life cycles, evolution, and diversity of Achaea, Bacteria, Protista, Fungi, and Plantae. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 1014 with a grade of C or better. ACTS Course Number: BIOL 1034. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1013
3 Credit Hours

A survey course to acquaint beginning students with the major institutions and practices in the business world, and to provide the elementary concepts of business. ACTS Course Number: BUSI 1013.

2113
3 Credit Hours

Statistical methods used in studying business and economic data, averages and dispersions, probability, sampling, statistical inference, estimation, tests of hypotheses, index numbers, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better. ACTS Course Number: BUSI 2103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1003
3 Credit Hours

An introductory course in the use of microcomputers within industries. Students will be introduced to the basics of various applications such as the Internet, email, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software. (This course does not fulfill the CIS 1503 Microcomputer Applications I requirement for any associate degree.)

1013
3 Credit Hours

A survey course to acquaint beginning students with the major institutions and practices in the business world, and to provide the elementary concepts of business. ACTS Course Number: BUSI 1013.

2113
3 Credit Hours

Statistical methods used in studying business and economic data, averages and dispersions, probability, sampling, statistical inference, estimation, tests of hypotheses, index numbers, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better. ACTS Course Number: BUSI 2103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1003
3 Credit Hours

An introductory course in the use of microcomputers within industries. Students will be introduced to the basics of various applications such as the Internet, email, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software. (This course does not fulfill the CIS 1503 Microcomputer Applications I requirement for any associate degree.)

2093
3 Credit Hours

An employment experience relating to the student's major within the AAS in Business Technology. An instructor will monitor the student's progress with the supervising employer. The student will submit a journal describing the experience and will be evaluated by the employer at the end of the internship. Prerequisite: Completion of 50 hours toward AAS degree, and a 2.00 GPA. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2093
3 Credit Hours

An employment experience relating to the student's major within the AAS in Business Technology. An instructor will monitor the student's progress with the supervising employer. The student will submit a journal describing the experience and will be evaluated by the employer at the end of the internship. Prerequisite: Completion of 50 hours toward AAS degree, and a 2.00 GPA. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2563
3 Credit Hours

Survey of the principles of effective oral and written communication. Practice in writing business letters and reports, and preparing various types of oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENG 1013 and keyboarding ability. ACTS Course Number: BUSI 2013. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the spring and Summer I semesters.

2413
3 Credit Hours

Instruction in use of word processing software on microcomputers. Familiarization with word processing procedures and terminology. Three hours per week plus laboratory time. This course is offered on the Beebe and Searcy campuses during the fall semester.

The study of electronic spreadsheet concepts. The fundamentals of worksheets, graphics, database, and macro features of electronic spreadsheets will be utilized to solve problems. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. Students concerned about transferability should check with their transfer institution. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2563
3 Credit Hours

Survey of the principles of effective oral and written communication. Practice in writing business letters and reports, and preparing various types of oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENG 1013 and keyboarding ability. ACTS Course Number: BUSI 2013. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the spring and Summer I semesters.

The study of electronic spreadsheet concepts. The fundamentals of worksheets, graphics, database, and macro features of electronic spreadsheets will be utilized to solve problems. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. Students concerned about transferability should check with their transfer institution. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed for the student who needs a review of communication skills and basic computer skills in order to be able to function in situations similar to those encountered in the workplace. The format provides for diagnosis, instruction, and practice with emphasis on competencies involved in the job search as well as job retention. Topics include how to prepare an employment plan and how to communicate effectively through reading, writing, and speaking. This course also provides instruction on using Windows operating system, database, worksheet, and presentation applications. Some sections of this course may require a research paper for certain degree program requirements. This course may be a requirement for all certificate students with less than six (6) hours of college English. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed for the student who needs a review of communication skills and basic computer skills in order to be able to function in situations similar to those encountered in the workplace. The format provides for diagnosis, instruction, and practice with emphasis on competencies involved in the job search as well as job retention. Topics include how to prepare an employment plan and how to communicate effectively through reading, writing, and speaking. This course also provides instruction on using Windows operating system, database, worksheet, and presentation applications. Some sections of this course may require a research paper for certain degree program requirements. This course may be a requirement for all certificate students with less than six (6) hours of college English. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

A brief survey of organic compounds, their nomenclature, classification, preparation, and reactions. An introduction to reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1014 or CHEM 1024 with a grade of C or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1003
3 Credit Hours

Fundamentals of chemistry and a survey of topics for students with no previous training in chemistry. The purpose of this course is to provide the necessary background to enter CHEM 1014. Lecture three hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 0013 with a grade of CR or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring and summer semesters.

1014
4 Credit Hours

Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: High School Chemistry within the last five years with a C or better and College Algebra eligible or CHEM 1003 with a C or better and College Algebra eligible. ACTS Course Number: CHEM 1414. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring and summer semesters.

2114
4 Credit Hours

Organic transformations, carbonyl chemistry, carbon-carbon bond formation, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry and radiochemistry of synthetic processes. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2104 with a grade of C or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2104
4 Credit Hours

Structure and bonding in organic compounds, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, introduction to reaction mechanisms and spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1024 with a grade of C or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1024
4 Credit Hours

Continuation of CHEM 1014. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1014 and MATH 1023 or MATH 1054 both with a grade of C or better. ACTS Course Number: CHEM 1424. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring and summer semesters.

A brief survey of organic compounds, their nomenclature, classification, preparation, and reactions. An introduction to reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1014 or CHEM 1024 with a grade of C or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1003
3 Credit Hours

Fundamentals of chemistry and a survey of topics for students with no previous training in chemistry. The purpose of this course is to provide the necessary background to enter CHEM 1014. Lecture three hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 0013 with a grade of CR or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring and summer semesters.

1014
4 Credit Hours

Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: High School Chemistry within the last five years with a C or better and College Algebra eligible or CHEM 1003 with a C or better and College Algebra eligible. ACTS Course Number: CHEM 1414. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring and summer semesters.

2114
4 Credit Hours

Organic transformations, carbonyl chemistry, carbon-carbon bond formation, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry and radiochemistry of synthetic processes. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2104 with a grade of C or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2104
4 Credit Hours

Structure and bonding in organic compounds, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, introduction to reaction mechanisms and spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1024 with a grade of C or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1024
4 Credit Hours

Continuation of CHEM 1014. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1014 and MATH 1023 or MATH 1054 both with a grade of C or better. ACTS Course Number: CHEM 1424. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring and summer semesters.

2453
3 Credit Hours

An intermediate course in the application of software packages for microcomputers with emphasis on common business functions. Students will gain an increased level of understanding of the integration of word processing, spreadsheet applications, databases, and presentation graphics. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. This course is offered on the Beebe and Searcy campuses and online during the fall and spring semesters.

2033
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to object oriented high level programming language. Emphasis will be on designing full featured GUI applications that exploit the key features of Microsoft Windows. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2023
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to computer animation concepts through application. Course concentrates on composition and manipulation, masking and layering, sound effects, animation rendering, and other animation techniques. Students will learn terminology, principles, and theories behind successful animation. A variety of sophisticated software programs will be used during the course. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. Students concerned about transferability should check with their transfer institution. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2403
3 Credit Hours

A study of database management principles including file organization, data storage, access methods, data structures, data privacy, security, and integrity. Surveys current generalized database management systems. Prerequisites: CIS 1503. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

Course content and length will vary. Subject matter will be determined by demand and recent developments in information systems. (Course may be repeated if topic changes.) Offered on demand.

This course provides an overview for the beginning Macintosh user who has little or no prior computer experience. Topics covered include identifying components, working with the menu bar, understanding the concepts of the Macintosh operating system, and file management. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

Structured design in software development will be emphasized, along with usage of the many software modules available in most libraries that come with C compilers. Prerequisites: CIS 1503. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2013
3 Credit Hours

This course provides instruction on the development of web pages using basic HTML and web page authoring software. Students should be familiar with the Internet and the World Wide Web. Students will be provided with a thorough introduction of HTML and basic web page design concepts. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. This course may not transfer for credit to some institutions. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1503
3 Credit Hours

A course designed to introduce students to the concepts of computer information systems through the application of software packages for microcomputers. Students will gain "hands-on" experience using popular business application software including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics. ACTS Course Number: CPSI 1003. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring, and Summer I semesters; online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters; and on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2813
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to desktop publishing concepts. Course concentrates on design, creation, formatting, and revision of business documents using microcomputers with desktop publishing software. Students will learn terminology, layout techniques, graphics creation and manipulation, text integration, and other desktop publishing principles. Prerequisites: CIS 1503. Typing skills are important. Keyboard familiarity is essential. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

Course content and length will vary. Subject matter will be determined by demand and recent developments in information systems. (Course may be repeated if topic changes.) Offered on demand.

Course content and length will vary. Subject matter will be determined by demand and recent developments in information systems. (Course may be repeated if topic changes.) Offered on demand.

2453
3 Credit Hours

An intermediate course in the application of software packages for microcomputers with emphasis on common business functions. Students will gain an increased level of understanding of the integration of word processing, spreadsheet applications, databases, and presentation graphics. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. This course is offered on the Beebe and Searcy campuses and online during the fall and spring semesters.

2033
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to object oriented high level programming language. Emphasis will be on designing full featured GUI applications that exploit the key features of Microsoft Windows. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2023
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to computer animation concepts through application. Course concentrates on composition and manipulation, masking and layering, sound effects, animation rendering, and other animation techniques. Students will learn terminology, principles, and theories behind successful animation. A variety of sophisticated software programs will be used during the course. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. Students concerned about transferability should check with their transfer institution. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2403
3 Credit Hours

A study of database management principles including file organization, data storage, access methods, data structures, data privacy, security, and integrity. Surveys current generalized database management systems. Prerequisites: CIS 1503. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

Course content and length will vary. Subject matter will be determined by demand and recent developments in information systems. (Course may be repeated if topic changes.) Offered on demand.

This course provides an overview for the beginning Macintosh user who has little or no prior computer experience. Topics covered include identifying components, working with the menu bar, understanding the concepts of the Macintosh operating system, and file management. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

Structured design in software development will be emphasized, along with usage of the many software modules available in most libraries that come with C compilers. Prerequisites: CIS 1503. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2013
3 Credit Hours

This course provides instruction on the development of web pages using basic HTML and web page authoring software. Students should be familiar with the Internet and the World Wide Web. Students will be provided with a thorough introduction of HTML and basic web page design concepts. Prerequisite: CIS 1503. This course may not transfer for credit to some institutions. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1503
3 Credit Hours

A course designed to introduce students to the concepts of computer information systems through the application of software packages for microcomputers. Students will gain "hands-on" experience using popular business application software including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics. ACTS Course Number: CPSI 1003. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring, and Summer I semesters; online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters; and on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2813
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to desktop publishing concepts. Course concentrates on design, creation, formatting, and revision of business documents using microcomputers with desktop publishing software. Students will learn terminology, layout techniques, graphics creation and manipulation, text integration, and other desktop publishing principles. Prerequisites: CIS 1503. Typing skills are important. Keyboard familiarity is essential. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

Course content and length will vary. Subject matter will be determined by demand and recent developments in information systems. (Course may be repeated if topic changes.) Offered on demand.

Course content and length will vary. Subject matter will be determined by demand and recent developments in information systems. (Course may be repeated if topic changes.) Offered on demand.

2464
4 Credit Hours

Advanced Computer Forensics is designed to provide students with tools to detect, contain, and eliminate intrusions using security-monitoring principles. This course will teach students theory and hands-on practice of network forensics. Students will learn how to conduct thorough examinations and how to explain, interpret, and draw the appropriate conclusions on what has been found and what it may mean. Prerequisite: CST 1354. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester of even numbered years. Available on student demand.

2234
4 Credit Hours

This course is the study of the current security concerns facing network administrators. Topics include security threats, enforcing an organized security policy, managing PKI, and monitoring security infrastructure. This course will help prepare the student for the Security+ certification exam. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 2134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2134
4 Credit Hours

It is the study of the most current version of Microsoft Server/Workstation Operation System. Topics include current LAN topology, hardware requirements, installing and maintaining the network Operating System, and file server setup and maintenance. It prepares the student to sit for the appropriate Microsoft Certified Professional exam. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 1104. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2324
4 Credit Hours

Remote-Access Networks is an elective course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems Technology degree. Topics include: assembling and cabling the WAN components, configuring PPP, establishing dedicated frame relay connection, optimizing traffic on dedicated WAN connections, scaling IP address with PAT and NAT, and troubleshooting the remote access network. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCNA and successfully passing skills test or CCNA Networking Academy. Available on student demand.

2454
4 Credit Hours

This course is the study of the most current version of Microsoft Exchange Server. Topics include: installation, configuration, management, monitoring, and troubleshooting an e-mail system. It prepares the student to sit for the appropriate Microsoft Certified Professional exam. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CST 2174. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester of odd numbered years. Available on student demand.

1134
4 Credit Hours

The second of four courses preparing the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. It is the study of router hardware and software. Topics include TCP/IP transport-layer protocols, flow control, IOS, router configuration, RIP and IGRP routing protocols, access-lists, and router troubleshooting. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 1114. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2484
4 Credit Hours

System Virtualization is a required course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems Technology degree. This course concerns a cloud computing operating system that is able to manage large pools of virtualized computing infrastructures, including software and hardware. Emphasis will be placed on the dramatic reduction of capital and operating costs associated with virtualization, which lends itself toward a more "green" environment. Multiple virtualization software packages will be presented in the class. Proper installation and configuration techniques will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CST 2174. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2444
4 Credit Hours

This course has been designed to help students gain the knowledge and skills needed to become a Linux administrator. This in-depth, hands-on course covers a variety of topics: installing and configuring Linux Enterprise Server, managing users and groups, securing the system, performance tuning, and backup and recovery services. By completing multiple lab exercises, the students will be able to apply course concepts and strengthen proficiency in Linux administration. Prerequisites: CST 1124. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester of even numbered years. Available on student demand.

Building Scalable Cisco Networks is an elective course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems Technology degree. Topics include: overview of scalable internetworks, managing traffic and access, managing IP traffic, extending IP addressing using VLSMs, configuring OSPF in a single area, interconnecting multiple OSPF areas, configuring enhanced IGRP, optimizing routing update operation, and configuring BGP. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCNA and successfully passing skills test or CCNA Networking Academy. Available on student demand.

An introductory course for the beginning Computer Systems student including such topics as computer hardware, software, firmware, and terminology. It is the first course in preparation toward the A+ certification. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2174
4 Credit Hours

This is a required course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems & Networking Technology degree. This course provides everything students need to build the knowledge and skills necessary to configure, manage, and troubleshoot a Microsoft Windows Server network infrastructure and to prepare for the Microsoft Certified Professional examination. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 2134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1354
4 Credit Hours

This is a beginning course, which is designed to introduce students to the ever-changing world of cyber-crime prevention. In this class, students will learn the basics of computer forensics and will be able to make forensically sound computer examinations. This course will teach students how data is stored, where the data is located, and how to recover all of the data. Students will learn how to conduct thorough examinations and how to explain, interpret, and draw the appropriate conclusions on what has been found and what it may mean. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1114
4 Credit Hours

This is the first of four courses preparing the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. It is the study of networking and internetworking. Topics include the OSI model, data link and network layer devices, IP addresses, subnet masking, ARP, RARP, cabling, topologies, LAN technologies, basic electrical and electronic issues in networks, and TCP/IP network-layer protocols. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2124
4 Credit Hours

The final of four courses preparing the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. It is a continuation of the study of router hardware and software. Topics include WAN theory and design, WAN technology, NAT, PAT, DHCP, basics of optical networks, PPP, frame relay, ISDN and network troubleshooting. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 1134 and CST 2114. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

Networking Troubleshooting is an elective course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems Technology degree. Topics include: support resources for troubleshooting, using troubleshooting methods, identifying troubleshooting targets, applying Cisco troubleshooting tools, documenting symptoms, actions and results, tracking log-ins and connections, diagnosing and correcting campus TCP/IP, catalyst, frame relay, and ISDN BRI problems and troubleshooting VLANs on routers and switches. Prerequisite: CST 2314 and CST 2324. Available on student demand.

2434
4 Credit Hours

This course is the design and study of the most current security practices for Microsoft Server products. Topics include: analyzing, designing, monitoring, and implementing security for Microsoft server products. It prepares the student to sit for the appropriate Microsoft Certified Professional exam. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CST 2124 and CST 2234. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester of odd numbered years. Available on student demand.

This course is a study of the installation and troubleshooting of microcomputer systems and servers/networks. Techniques for installing and maintaining a microcomputer system will be studied. Laboratory sessions will include hardware installation and operation, preventative maintenance, testing and troubleshooting techniques. This course has a required internship component. Prerequisite: CST 1104, CST 1124, CST 1134, CST 2114, CST 2174, and CST 2134. Student must be a CSNT major with second semester sophomore standing and a 3.0 cumulative GPA to take this course. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

It is the final course in preparing the student to sit for the A+ certification exam. It is the study of installation and troubleshooting of a microcomputer system. Techniques of installing, maintaining and troubleshooting a microcomputer system will be studied. Laboratory sessions will include hardware, operating system, and software installation, testing and troubleshooting (isolation down to the card level) techniques and preventive maintenance. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 1104, CST 1124, CST 1134, CST 2114, CST 2174, and CST 2134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1154
4 Credit Hours

Introduction to Computer Coding is a required course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Coding degree. This course is a study of a structured programming language with applications. Topics covered: structured design, flow charting and coding. Emphasis will be on planning, writing and debugging programs.

The third of four courses preparing the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. It is a continuation of the study of router hardware and software. Topics include LAN switching, VLANs, LAN design, EIGRP, OSPF, classless routing, and trunking. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CST 1114 and CST 1134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1124
4 Credit Hours

Instruction of the current microcomputer operating systems. Purpose of the OS, application of essential commands, file and disk management, directory organization, creating and modifying batch files, and system configurations will be studied. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2464
4 Credit Hours

Advanced Computer Forensics is designed to provide students with tools to detect, contain, and eliminate intrusions using security-monitoring principles. This course will teach students theory and hands-on practice of network forensics. Students will learn how to conduct thorough examinations and how to explain, interpret, and draw the appropriate conclusions on what has been found and what it may mean. Prerequisite: CST 1354. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester of even numbered years. Available on student demand.

2234
4 Credit Hours

This course is the study of the current security concerns facing network administrators. Topics include security threats, enforcing an organized security policy, managing PKI, and monitoring security infrastructure. This course will help prepare the student for the Security+ certification exam. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 2134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2134
4 Credit Hours

It is the study of the most current version of Microsoft Server/Workstation Operation System. Topics include current LAN topology, hardware requirements, installing and maintaining the network Operating System, and file server setup and maintenance. It prepares the student to sit for the appropriate Microsoft Certified Professional exam. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 1104. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2324
4 Credit Hours

Remote-Access Networks is an elective course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems Technology degree. Topics include: assembling and cabling the WAN components, configuring PPP, establishing dedicated frame relay connection, optimizing traffic on dedicated WAN connections, scaling IP address with PAT and NAT, and troubleshooting the remote access network. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCNA and successfully passing skills test or CCNA Networking Academy. Available on student demand.

2454
4 Credit Hours

This course is the study of the most current version of Microsoft Exchange Server. Topics include: installation, configuration, management, monitoring, and troubleshooting an e-mail system. It prepares the student to sit for the appropriate Microsoft Certified Professional exam. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CST 2174. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester of odd numbered years. Available on student demand.

1134
4 Credit Hours

The second of four courses preparing the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. It is the study of router hardware and software. Topics include TCP/IP transport-layer protocols, flow control, IOS, router configuration, RIP and IGRP routing protocols, access-lists, and router troubleshooting. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 1114. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2484
4 Credit Hours

System Virtualization is a required course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems Technology degree. This course concerns a cloud computing operating system that is able to manage large pools of virtualized computing infrastructures, including software and hardware. Emphasis will be placed on the dramatic reduction of capital and operating costs associated with virtualization, which lends itself toward a more "green" environment. Multiple virtualization software packages will be presented in the class. Proper installation and configuration techniques will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CST 2174. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2444
4 Credit Hours

This course has been designed to help students gain the knowledge and skills needed to become a Linux administrator. This in-depth, hands-on course covers a variety of topics: installing and configuring Linux Enterprise Server, managing users and groups, securing the system, performance tuning, and backup and recovery services. By completing multiple lab exercises, the students will be able to apply course concepts and strengthen proficiency in Linux administration. Prerequisites: CST 1124. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester of even numbered years. Available on student demand.

Building Scalable Cisco Networks is an elective course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems Technology degree. Topics include: overview of scalable internetworks, managing traffic and access, managing IP traffic, extending IP addressing using VLSMs, configuring OSPF in a single area, interconnecting multiple OSPF areas, configuring enhanced IGRP, optimizing routing update operation, and configuring BGP. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCNA and successfully passing skills test or CCNA Networking Academy. Available on student demand.

An introductory course for the beginning Computer Systems student including such topics as computer hardware, software, firmware, and terminology. It is the first course in preparation toward the A+ certification. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2174
4 Credit Hours

This is a required course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems & Networking Technology degree. This course provides everything students need to build the knowledge and skills necessary to configure, manage, and troubleshoot a Microsoft Windows Server network infrastructure and to prepare for the Microsoft Certified Professional examination. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 2134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1354
4 Credit Hours

This is a beginning course, which is designed to introduce students to the ever-changing world of cyber-crime prevention. In this class, students will learn the basics of computer forensics and will be able to make forensically sound computer examinations. This course will teach students how data is stored, where the data is located, and how to recover all of the data. Students will learn how to conduct thorough examinations and how to explain, interpret, and draw the appropriate conclusions on what has been found and what it may mean. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1114
4 Credit Hours

This is the first of four courses preparing the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. It is the study of networking and internetworking. Topics include the OSI model, data link and network layer devices, IP addresses, subnet masking, ARP, RARP, cabling, topologies, LAN technologies, basic electrical and electronic issues in networks, and TCP/IP network-layer protocols. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2124
4 Credit Hours

The final of four courses preparing the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. It is a continuation of the study of router hardware and software. Topics include WAN theory and design, WAN technology, NAT, PAT, DHCP, basics of optical networks, PPP, frame relay, ISDN and network troubleshooting. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 1134 and CST 2114. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

Networking Troubleshooting is an elective course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Systems Technology degree. Topics include: support resources for troubleshooting, using troubleshooting methods, identifying troubleshooting targets, applying Cisco troubleshooting tools, documenting symptoms, actions and results, tracking log-ins and connections, diagnosing and correcting campus TCP/IP, catalyst, frame relay, and ISDN BRI problems and troubleshooting VLANs on routers and switches. Prerequisite: CST 2314 and CST 2324. Available on student demand.

2434
4 Credit Hours

This course is the design and study of the most current security practices for Microsoft Server products. Topics include: analyzing, designing, monitoring, and implementing security for Microsoft server products. It prepares the student to sit for the appropriate Microsoft Certified Professional exam. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CST 2124 and CST 2234. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester of odd numbered years. Available on student demand.

This course is a study of the installation and troubleshooting of microcomputer systems and servers/networks. Techniques for installing and maintaining a microcomputer system will be studied. Laboratory sessions will include hardware installation and operation, preventative maintenance, testing and troubleshooting techniques. This course has a required internship component. Prerequisite: CST 1104, CST 1124, CST 1134, CST 2114, CST 2174, and CST 2134. Student must be a CSNT major with second semester sophomore standing and a 3.0 cumulative GPA to take this course. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

It is the final course in preparing the student to sit for the A+ certification exam. It is the study of installation and troubleshooting of a microcomputer system. Techniques of installing, maintaining and troubleshooting a microcomputer system will be studied. Laboratory sessions will include hardware, operating system, and software installation, testing and troubleshooting (isolation down to the card level) techniques and preventive maintenance. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CST 1104, CST 1124, CST 1134, CST 2114, CST 2174, and CST 2134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1154
4 Credit Hours

Introduction to Computer Coding is a required course for the Associate of Applied Science in Computer Coding degree. This course is a study of a structured programming language with applications. Topics covered: structured design, flow charting and coding. Emphasis will be on planning, writing and debugging programs.

The third of four courses preparing the student to sit for the Cisco Certified Network Associate certification exam. It is a continuation of the study of router hardware and software. Topics include LAN switching, VLANs, LAN design, EIGRP, OSPF, classless routing, and trunking. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CST 1114 and CST 1134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1124
4 Credit Hours

Instruction of the current microcomputer operating systems. Purpose of the OS, application of essential commands, file and disk management, directory organization, creating and modifying batch files, and system configurations will be studied. Both theory and hands-on application will be emphasized. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2244
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Solid Works. It provides hands-on training in the use of the following Solid Works features: Fillets, Revolve, Dome, Shell, Pattern, Mold Tools, Sweep, Loft, Draft, Shape, Rib, and Mirror. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 2144. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2163
3 Credit Hours

This is a course in structural steel drafting using the most current version of AutoCAD Architecture. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Column Framing Plans, Beam Framing Plans, Sections, Connection Details, Fabrication Details, and Bill of Materials. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2183
3 Credit Hours

This is a course in architectural drafting using the most current version of AutoCAD Architecture. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Basic House Design, Primary Considerations, Room Planning, Plot Plans, Foundation Plans, Sill and Floor Construction, Wall and Ceiling Construction, Doors and Windows, Stairs, Fireplaces and Chimneys, and Floor Plans, Roof designs, Elevations, Electrical Plans, Plumbing Plans, Climate Control Plans, Perspective Plans, Specifications, and Estimating Building Cost. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1114
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in drafting using the most current version of AutoCAD. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Design Concepts, Developments and Intersections, Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing, Fasteners, Detail Drawings, Assembly Drawings, Pictorial Drawings, and Welding Drawings. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2153
3 Credit Hours

In this course, participants will learn the fundamental theories and procedures of civil drafting using updated industry standard civil design software. Hands-on training include the areas of mapping scales, mapping symbols, surveying basics, location and direction, legal descriptions, plot plans, contour lines, profiles, horizontal alignments, and earthwork. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

In this entry level course, participants will learn both the fundamentals of drafting and the application of computer-aided design software. Learning is realized through lecture and hands-on experience using updated industry leading computer-aided design software. Those fundamentals of drafting include geometric construction, shape theory, orthographic projection, development of auxiliary and section views, and proper dimensioning techniques. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

This is a course in Geographic Information Systems/Global Positioning Systems using the most current version of Arc View software and state of the art GPS receivers. It provides hands-on training in the operation of the GPS receiver to include data collection and the downloading of data into the ArcView database. It also provides an introduction to databases in general and detailed work with the ArcView database as it relates to data manipulation in the civil drafting field and in other related areas of Geographic Information. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2284
4 Credit Hours

This is a course is a continuation of our Architectural Drafting class and covers the more advanced functionality of Autodesk Revit’s building information modeling (BIM) software. Students should master the techniques required to create custom template files, family items, schedules, legends, materials, and renderings. This course will also explore the phasing, design options, and collaboration tools of Revit. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 2183. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2234
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Autodesk Inventor. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Lofting, 3D Sketches, Sheet Metal, Parameters, iParts, iMates, Lighting, Materials and Color, Rendering, and Simulating Motion. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 2134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2134
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of AutoDesk Inventor. It provides hands-on training in the areas of the Inventor User Interface, Parametric Modeling Fundamentals, Constructive Solid Geometry Concepts, Model History Tree, Parametric Constraints, BORN Technique and Work Features, Part Drawings and Associative Functionality, Symmetrical Features in Designs, Geometric Construction Tools, Parent/Child Relationships, and Assembly Modeling. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2144
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Solid Works. It provides hands-on training in the areas of the SolidWorks User Interface, Parametric Modeling Fundamentals, Constructive Solid Geometry Concepts, Model History Tree, Parametric Constraints, BORN Technique and Work Features, Part Drawings, and Associative Functionality, Symmetrical Features in Designs, Geometric construction Tools, Parent/Child Relationships, and Assembly Modeling. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2214
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Pro/Engineer. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Ribs, Relations, Failures, Family Tables, Drafts, Text Protrusions, Shell, Reorder, Sweeps, Blends and Splines, Helical Sweeps and 3D Model Notes, Assembly Constraints, Exploded Assemblies, and Assembly Drawings. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 2114. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2114
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Pro/Engineer. It provides hands-on training in the areas of the Pro/Engineer User Interface, Parametric Modeling Fundamentals, Extrusions, Editing, Holes and Rounds, Datums and Sections, Revolved Protrusions and Cuts, Chamfers and Threads, Groups and Patterns, Drawing Formats and Title Blocks, Detailing, Section and Auxiliary Views. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2244
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Solid Works. It provides hands-on training in the use of the following Solid Works features: Fillets, Revolve, Dome, Shell, Pattern, Mold Tools, Sweep, Loft, Draft, Shape, Rib, and Mirror. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 2144. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2163
3 Credit Hours

This is a course in structural steel drafting using the most current version of AutoCAD Architecture. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Column Framing Plans, Beam Framing Plans, Sections, Connection Details, Fabrication Details, and Bill of Materials. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2183
3 Credit Hours

This is a course in architectural drafting using the most current version of AutoCAD Architecture. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Basic House Design, Primary Considerations, Room Planning, Plot Plans, Foundation Plans, Sill and Floor Construction, Wall and Ceiling Construction, Doors and Windows, Stairs, Fireplaces and Chimneys, and Floor Plans, Roof designs, Elevations, Electrical Plans, Plumbing Plans, Climate Control Plans, Perspective Plans, Specifications, and Estimating Building Cost. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1114
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in drafting using the most current version of AutoCAD. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Design Concepts, Developments and Intersections, Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing, Fasteners, Detail Drawings, Assembly Drawings, Pictorial Drawings, and Welding Drawings. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2153
3 Credit Hours

In this course, participants will learn the fundamental theories and procedures of civil drafting using updated industry standard civil design software. Hands-on training include the areas of mapping scales, mapping symbols, surveying basics, location and direction, legal descriptions, plot plans, contour lines, profiles, horizontal alignments, and earthwork. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

In this entry level course, participants will learn both the fundamentals of drafting and the application of computer-aided design software. Learning is realized through lecture and hands-on experience using updated industry leading computer-aided design software. Those fundamentals of drafting include geometric construction, shape theory, orthographic projection, development of auxiliary and section views, and proper dimensioning techniques. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

This is a course in Geographic Information Systems/Global Positioning Systems using the most current version of Arc View software and state of the art GPS receivers. It provides hands-on training in the operation of the GPS receiver to include data collection and the downloading of data into the ArcView database. It also provides an introduction to databases in general and detailed work with the ArcView database as it relates to data manipulation in the civil drafting field and in other related areas of Geographic Information. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2284
4 Credit Hours

This is a course is a continuation of our Architectural Drafting class and covers the more advanced functionality of Autodesk Revit’s building information modeling (BIM) software. Students should master the techniques required to create custom template files, family items, schedules, legends, materials, and renderings. This course will also explore the phasing, design options, and collaboration tools of Revit. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 2183. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2234
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Autodesk Inventor. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Lofting, 3D Sketches, Sheet Metal, Parameters, iParts, iMates, Lighting, Materials and Color, Rendering, and Simulating Motion. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 2134. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2134
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of AutoDesk Inventor. It provides hands-on training in the areas of the Inventor User Interface, Parametric Modeling Fundamentals, Constructive Solid Geometry Concepts, Model History Tree, Parametric Constraints, BORN Technique and Work Features, Part Drawings and Associative Functionality, Symmetrical Features in Designs, Geometric Construction Tools, Parent/Child Relationships, and Assembly Modeling. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2144
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Solid Works. It provides hands-on training in the areas of the SolidWorks User Interface, Parametric Modeling Fundamentals, Constructive Solid Geometry Concepts, Model History Tree, Parametric Constraints, BORN Technique and Work Features, Part Drawings, and Associative Functionality, Symmetrical Features in Designs, Geometric construction Tools, Parent/Child Relationships, and Assembly Modeling. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2214
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Pro/Engineer. It provides hands-on training in the areas of Ribs, Relations, Failures, Family Tables, Drafts, Text Protrusions, Shell, Reorder, Sweeps, Blends and Splines, Helical Sweeps and 3D Model Notes, Assembly Constraints, Exploded Assemblies, and Assembly Drawings. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 2114. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2114
4 Credit Hours

This is a course in interactive computer-aided drafting using the most current version of Pro/Engineer. It provides hands-on training in the areas of the Pro/Engineer User Interface, Parametric Modeling Fundamentals, Extrusions, Editing, Holes and Rounds, Datums and Sections, Revolved Protrusions and Cuts, Chamfers and Threads, Groups and Patterns, Drawing Formats and Title Blocks, Detailing, Section and Auxiliary Views. Lecture three hours. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: EGT 1004. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course will teach the design and modification of a prototype model. Model projects will be produced by the use of a three-dimensional printer. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2703
3 Credit Hours

The student will continue to improve their basic skills on the milling machine and lathe while learning about more advanced machining techniques. Dividing heads, rotary tables and boring heads will be used on the mill while boring, grinding, tapers and threading will be done on the lathe. Better finishes and tighter tolerances will be expected. This course is about 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

In this course of study, the student will learn about advanced methods of CNC programming and metal cutting advancements such as high speed milling and the application of chip thinning and also be exposed to various methods of mass production as well as prototyping one part. Students will have individual projects as well as a class project where each student will be responsible for designing and manufacturing components that will assemble and function with the components built by their classmates. Course will include the CNC Mill, CNC Lathe and CNC Router. Student will spend time writing, entering, and editing programs as well as applying knowledge and skills learned in MasterCam and SolidWorks. This course is 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course will provide instruction in the basic skills needed in the machining trade. Some of these skills are blueprint reading, precision measurements, use of basic metal working tools and material layout. The basic skills needed for the operation of a metal lathe and milling machine will be covered, also. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Related safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2133
3 Credit Hours

Students will learn the fundamentals of Computer Integrated Manufacturing. In this course, students will utilize knowledge of CAD/CAM, lean manufacturing, quality assurance/control, and the various types of manufacturing. In addition to this, students will learn about cost calculation and automated assembly. Safety will be emphasized throughout the course.

1602
2 Credit Hours

In this course of study, students will receive the fundamentals of plastic injection, die construction & operation, laser engraving, and plasma operations. Experience will be gained in the machining of plastic by using manual and computerized machinery, as well as the electronic discharge machine to study the many ways a cavity for a mold can be produced. Students will learn the raster and vector techniques of laser engraving and plasma operating. Students will utilize the knowledge gained in the manufacturing materials class. Safety will be emphasized through the course. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2003
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to teach students the advanced level of the use of Master Cam. This course will employ the use of three-dimensional design and programming. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2113
3 Credit Hours

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of lean manufacturing and quality assurance and control. Students will also be taught OSHA regulations and a certification test will be given. In this course, students will also have the opportunity to receive forklift certification. Safety will be emphasized throughout the course.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course utilizes Master Cam software to design, test and manufacture parts. The student will learn how to draw and manipulate a design on the screen and how to create a tool path, and finally how to send information to a machine tool for manufacturing a part. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2123
3 Credit Hours

In this course, students will be taught from the concept stage to production. They will be given a blueprint they have to produce using SolidWorks and MasterCAM. They will then move the design into the production stage. Students will use manual and CNC machines to produce a finished product. Safety will be emphasized throughout the course.

2103
3 Credit Hours

This course teaches the advanced level of design and modification of a prototype model. This course is also designed to produce models and physical testing of the working models at the advanced level. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

In this course of study, the student will learn about advanced and short-cut methods of programming, such as the repeat function, the subroutine function, the rotate function, and how to scale and mirror a program. The student will spend time writing, entering, and editing programs. This course is 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1402
2 Credit Hours

In this course of study, students will learn about various types of manufacturing materials such as metal, plastic, and wood. Students will learn how different heat treatment and annealing procedures can change the properties of the metals. Students will also learn about laser engraving, including which materials such as wood and plastic behave when laser engraved, and which plastics are unsafe. Safety will be emphasized throughout the course. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course will teach the design and modification of a prototype model. Model projects will be produced by the use of a three-dimensional printer. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2703
3 Credit Hours

The student will continue to improve their basic skills on the milling machine and lathe while learning about more advanced machining techniques. Dividing heads, rotary tables and boring heads will be used on the mill while boring, grinding, tapers and threading will be done on the lathe. Better finishes and tighter tolerances will be expected. This course is about 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

In this course of study, the student will learn about advanced methods of CNC programming and metal cutting advancements such as high speed milling and the application of chip thinning and also be exposed to various methods of mass production as well as prototyping one part. Students will have individual projects as well as a class project where each student will be responsible for designing and manufacturing components that will assemble and function with the components built by their classmates. Course will include the CNC Mill, CNC Lathe and CNC Router. Student will spend time writing, entering, and editing programs as well as applying knowledge and skills learned in MasterCam and SolidWorks. This course is 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course will provide instruction in the basic skills needed in the machining trade. Some of these skills are blueprint reading, precision measurements, use of basic metal working tools and material layout. The basic skills needed for the operation of a metal lathe and milling machine will be covered, also. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Related safety will be taught and emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2133
3 Credit Hours

Students will learn the fundamentals of Computer Integrated Manufacturing. In this course, students will utilize knowledge of CAD/CAM, lean manufacturing, quality assurance/control, and the various types of manufacturing. In addition to this, students will learn about cost calculation and automated assembly. Safety will be emphasized throughout the course.

1602
2 Credit Hours

In this course of study, students will receive the fundamentals of plastic injection, die construction & operation, laser engraving, and plasma operations. Experience will be gained in the machining of plastic by using manual and computerized machinery, as well as the electronic discharge machine to study the many ways a cavity for a mold can be produced. Students will learn the raster and vector techniques of laser engraving and plasma operating. Students will utilize the knowledge gained in the manufacturing materials class. Safety will be emphasized through the course. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2003
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to teach students the advanced level of the use of Master Cam. This course will employ the use of three-dimensional design and programming. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2113
3 Credit Hours

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of lean manufacturing and quality assurance and control. Students will also be taught OSHA regulations and a certification test will be given. In this course, students will also have the opportunity to receive forklift certification. Safety will be emphasized throughout the course.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course utilizes Master Cam software to design, test and manufacture parts. The student will learn how to draw and manipulate a design on the screen and how to create a tool path, and finally how to send information to a machine tool for manufacturing a part. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2123
3 Credit Hours

In this course, students will be taught from the concept stage to production. They will be given a blueprint they have to produce using SolidWorks and MasterCAM. They will then move the design into the production stage. Students will use manual and CNC machines to produce a finished product. Safety will be emphasized throughout the course.

2103
3 Credit Hours

This course teaches the advanced level of design and modification of a prototype model. This course is also designed to produce models and physical testing of the working models at the advanced level. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

In this course of study, the student will learn about advanced and short-cut methods of programming, such as the repeat function, the subroutine function, the rotate function, and how to scale and mirror a program. The student will spend time writing, entering, and editing programs. This course is 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1402
2 Credit Hours

In this course of study, students will learn about various types of manufacturing materials such as metal, plastic, and wood. Students will learn how different heat treatment and annealing procedures can change the properties of the metals. Students will also learn about laser engraving, including which materials such as wood and plastic behave when laser engraved, and which plastics are unsafe. Safety will be emphasized throughout the course. This course will be 1/3 theory and 2/3 lab. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester

2003
3 Credit Hours

In the Capstone Project, Creative Arts Enterprise students will complete the required body of marketable work in their chosen media, and then they will market, display, and sell their work, experiencing both wholesale and retail markets. The emphasis is on the actual experience of implementing what has been learned through the preceding classes, bringing the business and creative aspects of the program together in a culminating project. Prerequisite: Approval of Creative Arts Enterprise advisor.

The development of critical thinking skills in criminal justice has never been more vital. Critical thinking skills can be learned with practice and guidance by changing the actions involved in decision-making so that they become part of the permanent behavior of criminal justice professionals in enforcement activities. This course fosters critical thinking skills of different scenarios and weighing probable solutions for situations personnel are often faced with. This course will serve to develop and enhance critical thinking skills for criminal justice professionals in acquiring new ways of thinking more proficiently and becoming more proactive in combating modern crimes.

Provides an understanding of the complex factors in human relations. The philosophy of law enforcement is examined with the emphasis on the social forces that create social change and disturbance. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

A scientific study of criminal behavior, cognitive behavior, and a psychological perspective regarding psycho-social contributions to criminal behavior. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course addresses the issue of how the Criminal Justice System deals with the victim of a violent crime. Examining such areas as societal changes over the years towards victims; children as victims versus adult victims; victim reparation and the change of victim rights with the advent of plea bargaining. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2253
3 Credit Hours

Includes fundamentals and theory of an investigation, conduct at crime scenes, collection and presentation of physical evidence, and methods used in the police service industry. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

This course meets the Arkansas Law Enforcement Training Academy Jailers Training to include, Ethics and Professionalism, Fingerprinting, Escape Prevention, Prisoner Transport, Special Needs Inmates, Search of a Person, Constitutional Rights, and other associated areas of jailer responsibilities..

This course examines the principles, problems, and trends in the probation, parole and communications of both adults and juveniles. It overviews the methods of achieving organizational change and the evaluation of correctional units and probation systems.

2243
3 Credit Hours

This course covers topics such as the discovery, recognition, observation, identification and collection and comparison of physical evidence, including a review of various current techniques in the testing of physical evidence. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1123
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and appreciation for the darkest part of our society, attempting to understand the incomprehensibility of horrific acts committed by individuals we yet to understand. Criminal Profiling is a multi-disciplinary practice that employs knowledge of Criminalistics, death investigation and psychology. Students will develop an understanding of these disciplines and how they are applied in understanding and organizing investigative leads towards apprehension and/or at least assisting law enforcement organizations with foundation in which to launch investigations. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1013
3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the law enforcement segment of the criminal justice system, with an examination of the history and development of law enforcement, especially in the United States. The various job and career opportunities will be reviewed. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2213
3 Credit Hours

This basic course provides an examination of the nature and extent of crime and theories of crime causation, as well as the societal reaction of criminal behavior.

1113
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to introduce Criminal Justice students into the world of ethics and its application to professionals in the criminal justice system. Students will become familiar with moral laws, both good and bad; ethical issues in punishment versus rehabilitation; moral and ethical education of police officers and the other criminal justice employees; and ethical decisions when dealing with homeland security issues. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2263
3 Credit Hours

Rules of evidence of import at the operational level in law enforcement and criminal procedures, personal conduct of the officer as a witness, and examination of safeguarding personal constitutional liberties. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

Criminal justice students need to begin, understand, and develop social issues that affect the criminal justice system and the administration of justice. Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice is a course that examines a broad range of problems faced by the criminal justice system in the 21st century. By examining such complex social issues such as community relations, diversity, racial profiling, police use of deadly force, gangs, immigration, drug control policy, domestic terrorism, sentencing guidelines, etc., students have an opportunity to recognize the impact of crime on society as well as the criminal justice system’s response to such issues.

1023
3 Credit Hours

This course is intended to expose the student to the workings of criminal justice systems, exploring the historical development, current operation, and future trends of criminal justice. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary problems in the definition of law, the enforcement of law, strategies of policing, judicial systems, sentencing strategies, and correctional practices. Content includes not only practices in the United States, but also other cultures and their systems of justice. ACTS Course Number: CRJU 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

This course covers the state minimum requirements for those students seeking Part-Time II/Auxiliary Officer/Specialized Police certification.

The development of critical thinking skills in criminal justice has never been more vital. Critical thinking skills can be learned with practice and guidance by changing the actions involved in decision-making so that they become part of the permanent behavior of criminal justice professionals in enforcement activities. This course fosters critical thinking skills of different scenarios and weighing probable solutions for situations personnel are often faced with. This course will serve to develop and enhance critical thinking skills for criminal justice professionals in acquiring new ways of thinking more proficiently and becoming more proactive in combating modern crimes.

Provides an understanding of the complex factors in human relations. The philosophy of law enforcement is examined with the emphasis on the social forces that create social change and disturbance. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

A scientific study of criminal behavior, cognitive behavior, and a psychological perspective regarding psycho-social contributions to criminal behavior. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course addresses the issue of how the Criminal Justice System deals with the victim of a violent crime. Examining such areas as societal changes over the years towards victims; children as victims versus adult victims; victim reparation and the change of victim rights with the advent of plea bargaining. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2253
3 Credit Hours

Includes fundamentals and theory of an investigation, conduct at crime scenes, collection and presentation of physical evidence, and methods used in the police service industry. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

This course meets the Arkansas Law Enforcement Training Academy Jailers Training to include, Ethics and Professionalism, Fingerprinting, Escape Prevention, Prisoner Transport, Special Needs Inmates, Search of a Person, Constitutional Rights, and other associated areas of jailer responsibilities..

This course examines the principles, problems, and trends in the probation, parole and communications of both adults and juveniles. It overviews the methods of achieving organizational change and the evaluation of correctional units and probation systems.

2243
3 Credit Hours

This course covers topics such as the discovery, recognition, observation, identification and collection and comparison of physical evidence, including a review of various current techniques in the testing of physical evidence. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1123
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and appreciation for the darkest part of our society, attempting to understand the incomprehensibility of horrific acts committed by individuals we yet to understand. Criminal Profiling is a multi-disciplinary practice that employs knowledge of Criminalistics, death investigation and psychology. Students will develop an understanding of these disciplines and how they are applied in understanding and organizing investigative leads towards apprehension and/or at least assisting law enforcement organizations with foundation in which to launch investigations. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1013
3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the law enforcement segment of the criminal justice system, with an examination of the history and development of law enforcement, especially in the United States. The various job and career opportunities will be reviewed. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2213
3 Credit Hours

This basic course provides an examination of the nature and extent of crime and theories of crime causation, as well as the societal reaction of criminal behavior.

1113
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to introduce Criminal Justice students into the world of ethics and its application to professionals in the criminal justice system. Students will become familiar with moral laws, both good and bad; ethical issues in punishment versus rehabilitation; moral and ethical education of police officers and the other criminal justice employees; and ethical decisions when dealing with homeland security issues. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2263
3 Credit Hours

Rules of evidence of import at the operational level in law enforcement and criminal procedures, personal conduct of the officer as a witness, and examination of safeguarding personal constitutional liberties. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

Criminal justice students need to begin, understand, and develop social issues that affect the criminal justice system and the administration of justice. Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice is a course that examines a broad range of problems faced by the criminal justice system in the 21st century. By examining such complex social issues such as community relations, diversity, racial profiling, police use of deadly force, gangs, immigration, drug control policy, domestic terrorism, sentencing guidelines, etc., students have an opportunity to recognize the impact of crime on society as well as the criminal justice system’s response to such issues.

1023
3 Credit Hours

This course is intended to expose the student to the workings of criminal justice systems, exploring the historical development, current operation, and future trends of criminal justice. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary problems in the definition of law, the enforcement of law, strategies of policing, judicial systems, sentencing strategies, and correctional practices. Content includes not only practices in the United States, but also other cultures and their systems of justice. ACTS Course Number: CRJU 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

This course covers the state minimum requirements for those students seeking Part-Time II/Auxiliary Officer/Specialized Police certification.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course takes the student from the design of a bakery to the inner workings of the different venues of bakery shops. Baking history will be included. Basic equipment and terminology will be covered. Experiments of ingredient activity and their functions will be discussed. One hour lecture, four hours lab.

1013
3 Credit Hours

This course provides students will skills and knowledge of the organization, equipment and responsibilities of the “cold kitchen.” Students are introduced to and prepare cold hors d’oeuvres, sandwiches, salads, as well as basic charcuterie items while focusing on the total utilization of product. Reception foods and buffet arrangements are introduced. Students must pass a written and practical exam. One hour lecture, four hours lab.

This course covers the practical skills and knowledge necessary for the effective operation of food and beverage service in a variety of settings. Students will be introduced to service management and leadership, planning skills, and hands-on techniques for consistently delivering quality service in every type of operation. One hour lecture, four hours lab.

2014
4 Credit Hours

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to demonstrate advanced level cooking techniques and methods, recipe conversion, and professional food preparation and handling as well as managerial competencies. Two hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisites: HA 1013, HA 1023, HA 2003.

1023
3 Credit Hours

This course involves instruction in the preparation of stocks, soups and classical sauces, contemporary sauces, accompaniments and the pairing of sauces with a variety of foods. One hours lecture, four hours lab.

1033
3 Credit Hours

This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected Classical European and World Cuisines. In studying Classical European Cuisines student prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional, regional dishes of the British Isles, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Scandinavian countries. In studying World cuisines, students prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional, regional dishes of Spain, the Middle East, Turkey, Greece, Africa and India. Importance will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques representative of the cuisines. One hour lecture, four hours lab.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course takes the student from the design of a bakery to the inner workings of the different venues of bakery shops. Baking history will be included. Basic equipment and terminology will be covered. Experiments of ingredient activity and their functions will be discussed. One hour lecture, four hours lab.

1013
3 Credit Hours

This course provides students will skills and knowledge of the organization, equipment and responsibilities of the “cold kitchen.” Students are introduced to and prepare cold hors d’oeuvres, sandwiches, salads, as well as basic charcuterie items while focusing on the total utilization of product. Reception foods and buffet arrangements are introduced. Students must pass a written and practical exam. One hour lecture, four hours lab.

This course covers the practical skills and knowledge necessary for the effective operation of food and beverage service in a variety of settings. Students will be introduced to service management and leadership, planning skills, and hands-on techniques for consistently delivering quality service in every type of operation. One hour lecture, four hours lab.

2014
4 Credit Hours

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to demonstrate advanced level cooking techniques and methods, recipe conversion, and professional food preparation and handling as well as managerial competencies. Two hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisites: HA 1013, HA 1023, HA 2003.

1023
3 Credit Hours

This course involves instruction in the preparation of stocks, soups and classical sauces, contemporary sauces, accompaniments and the pairing of sauces with a variety of foods. One hours lecture, four hours lab.

1033
3 Credit Hours

This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected Classical European and World Cuisines. In studying Classical European Cuisines student prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional, regional dishes of the British Isles, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Scandinavian countries. In studying World cuisines, students prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional, regional dishes of Spain, the Middle East, Turkey, Greece, Africa and India. Importance will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques representative of the cuisines. One hour lecture, four hours lab.

2304
4 Credit Hours

This course deals with the knowledge required of a diesel mechanic with the over-the-road class eight tractor as well as smaller trucks. The student should be able to properly disconnect the trailer and maneuver the tractor safely into the shop. Also, the student should be able to perform a complete maintenance and pre-trip inspection. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1404
4 Credit Hours

This course deals with the steering component operation and repair as well as the suspension of the over the road truck. The student should be able to identify the steering components and suspension parts of a heavy truck. The student will be able to diagnose and repair failures of steering and suspensions of heavy trucks. The diesel mechanic should be versed in highway truck steering and suspension systems. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

This course is the study of the different components that make up the electronic controls on a diesel engine and their functions. This course covers computer principles and the computer control system makeup. A study of electronically activated injectors, electronic transmission controls, electronic cruise control, and a number of sensors that send signals to the computer is included. Other topics covered include basic fundamentals of electricity, Ohm’s law, measuring voltage, amperage, and resistance. Students study three types of electrical circuits, drawing and reading schematics, and distinguishing between AC and DC circuits. Safety and the use of special tools are emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1104
4 Credit Hours

This course consists of basic fundamentals of internal combustion engines, with emphasis on diesel powered engines. The course stresses different types of engine cylinder and valve arrangements, ignition, fuel, lubrication, air induction, and cooling systems. Laboratory work will include disassembly and reassembly of diesel engines and component parts with emphasis on diagnosis and repair. The proper use of tools and safe work habits will be emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2204
4 Credit Hours

This course is a study of the different types and makeup of mechanical, air, and hydraulic brake systems. This course covers hydraulic principles and the makeup of hydraulic systems. A study of pumps, motors, controls, valves, and cylinders will also be covered. Students will demonstrate the ability to check pressures, troubleshoot the systems, and make necessary repairs and/or adjustments. Emphasis will be on maintenance, repair, safety and special tools. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2104
4 Credit Hours

This course will cover the operational principles of air conditioning systems and related components as applied to diesel equipment with emphasis on testing, maintenance, and repair. Safety and the use of special tools are emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2304
4 Credit Hours

This course deals with the knowledge required of a diesel mechanic with the over-the-road class eight tractor as well as smaller trucks. The student should be able to properly disconnect the trailer and maneuver the tractor safely into the shop. Also, the student should be able to perform a complete maintenance and pre-trip inspection. Safety is emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1404
4 Credit Hours

This course deals with the steering component operation and repair as well as the suspension of the over the road truck. The student should be able to identify the steering components and suspension parts of a heavy truck. The student will be able to diagnose and repair failures of steering and suspensions of heavy trucks. The diesel mechanic should be versed in highway truck steering and suspension systems. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

This course is the study of the different components that make up the electronic controls on a diesel engine and their functions. This course covers computer principles and the computer control system makeup. A study of electronically activated injectors, electronic transmission controls, electronic cruise control, and a number of sensors that send signals to the computer is included. Other topics covered include basic fundamentals of electricity, Ohm’s law, measuring voltage, amperage, and resistance. Students study three types of electrical circuits, drawing and reading schematics, and distinguishing between AC and DC circuits. Safety and the use of special tools are emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1104
4 Credit Hours

This course consists of basic fundamentals of internal combustion engines, with emphasis on diesel powered engines. The course stresses different types of engine cylinder and valve arrangements, ignition, fuel, lubrication, air induction, and cooling systems. Laboratory work will include disassembly and reassembly of diesel engines and component parts with emphasis on diagnosis and repair. The proper use of tools and safe work habits will be emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2204
4 Credit Hours

This course is a study of the different types and makeup of mechanical, air, and hydraulic brake systems. This course covers hydraulic principles and the makeup of hydraulic systems. A study of pumps, motors, controls, valves, and cylinders will also be covered. Students will demonstrate the ability to check pressures, troubleshoot the systems, and make necessary repairs and/or adjustments. Emphasis will be on maintenance, repair, safety and special tools. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2104
4 Credit Hours

This course will cover the operational principles of air conditioning systems and related components as applied to diesel equipment with emphasis on testing, maintenance, and repair. Safety and the use of special tools are emphasized. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course is the study of environmental and hereditary effects on the cognitive, affective, psychomotor, and sociolinguistic development of typically and atypically developing children from conception to middle school (conception through age 8) with diverse cultural backgrounds within and outside of the United States. The students will be introduced to methods used to observe and evaluate children's development and recognize possible delays in development. Practical application of theory is provided through a variety of hands-on experiences and a minimum of five (5) hours of observation. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1301
1 Credit Hours

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain valuable insight into the field of early childhood education. Students will observe infants, toddlers, and preschool children in a child care facility approved by the instructor. A total of 96 hours of observation is required. The in-class instruction will focus on the development of the following skills: observation, record keeping, and interpretation of data. The instructor will help with placement for those students who are not currently employed at a child care facility. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2203
3 Credit Hours

Students will become familiar with the laws pertaining to disabled children in child care facilities and special accommodations that child care facilities are required to make according to the Americans with Disabilities Act. Students will also learn how to tailor classroom curriculum to meet the individual needs of each child. Students will become familiar with signs and symptoms of a variety of physical, mental and learning disabilities, their prognosis, treatment, educational implications and expected outcomes. Students will also compare and contrast the pros and cons of integrating special needs children into the regular classroom. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

This course is designed to make the early childhood educator aware of the acquisition of language and how to provide children, birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs, with language rich environments by incorporating the four areas of language: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

This course introduces students to current research in the field of Early Childhood Education. Students will develop a knowledge base of the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct through analyzing case studies designed to demonstrate competencies compatible with current research and practice, development of a professional portfolio to demonstrate competencies in the skills relating to the NAEYC Associate Degree Standards.

1302
2 Credit Hours

Students must be employed or volunteer in a licensed childcare facility to apply the knowledge acquired and skills learned in previous coursework. Observation of the student's work and evaluation of student skills are conducted by instructors following the NAEYC Associate Standards. Students must demonstrate competency in all areas observed and complete a minimum number of clock hours, determined by the institution, of observation and work experience with children birth to five. An emphasis will be on the observation of physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional development in connection with previous courses. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

Students will learn how to develop policies and procedures pertaining to child care facilities based on Arkansas State Licensing Regulations. They will develop a parent handbook, personnel policies, job descriptions and teacher evaluations. Students will design a building blueprint and will create an operating budget and a one-time start up budget. Students will also participate in simulated job interviews and will demonstrate questioning techniques that facilitate answers that provide insight into personalities and attitudes within the statutes of the law. Students will also become familiar with child care software and how to run programs that will monitor student attendance, emergency information and billing. Students will also learn how to use the Arkansas State Voucher Program. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

Students will become familiar with a variety of ways to introduce children, birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs to ideas and concepts related to math and science. Students will create activities; plan and practice developmentally appropriate experiences that would meet recognized standards (NAEYC, NCTM, etc.) for these areas. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2323
3 Credit Hours

This course is based on the foundation of research in child development and focuses on planning and implementing enriching environments with appropriate interactions and activities for young children (birth through 2) including those with special needs, to maximize physical, cognitive, communication, creative language/literacy, and social/emotional growth and development. Competencies are based on Standards developed by the National Associate for the Education of Yong Children for quality early childhood settings. Also covered:  Information on the Quality Approval process and Accreditation for Early Childhood settings in Arkansas, no called Better Beginnings  Arkansas Frameworks Handbook for Infants and Toddlers

This course is based on the foundation of research in child development and focuses on planning and implementing enriching environments with appropriate interactions and activities for young children (ages 0-5 years) including those with special needs, to maximize physical, cognitive, communication, creative, language/literacy, and social/emotional growth and development. Competencies are based on standards developed by the National Association for the Education of Young Children for quality early childhood settings. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course relates principles of child development to appropriate methods of guiding children's behavior for children birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs. Techniques for managing groups of children in the various childcare settings are practiced.

2113
3 Credit Hours

Students will become proficient and certified in CPR and first aid. Students will also become familiar with signs and symptoms of communicable illnesses that pertain to children. Students will become proficient in dealing with emergency situations. Upon completion of the CPR and first aid portion of the course, students will participate in a simulated trauma where they will be required to prioritize and treat injuries until emergency medical personnel arrive. Students will also become familiar with childhood immunizations and how to track them manually and on the computer. Students will also learn how to monitor children’s normal growth patterns and how to identify and seek treatment for abnormalities. In the safety portion of the course, students will become familiar with basic classroom and playground safety issues and how to avoid problems. They will also learn how to inspect playgrounds and identify hazards on playgrounds. Students will design a developmentally appropriate playground and budget that complies with Arkansas Licensing Regulations. Students will also be able to demonstrate proper fire and emergency procedures and will develop evacuation plans that meet Arkansas State Regulations. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the historical roles of families in their child's development. The student will become familiar with the theories supporting early childhood education and learn how to develop an effective program designed uniquely for children (ages birth to eight). The students will also obtain knowledge of state and federal laws pertaining to the care and education of young children. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course is the study of environmental and hereditary effects on the cognitive, affective, psychomotor, and sociolinguistic development of typically and atypically developing children from conception to middle school (conception through age 8) with diverse cultural backgrounds within and outside of the United States. The students will be introduced to methods used to observe and evaluate children's development and recognize possible delays in development. Practical application of theory is provided through a variety of hands-on experiences and a minimum of five (5) hours of observation. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1301
1 Credit Hours

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain valuable insight into the field of early childhood education. Students will observe infants, toddlers, and preschool children in a child care facility approved by the instructor. A total of 96 hours of observation is required. The in-class instruction will focus on the development of the following skills: observation, record keeping, and interpretation of data. The instructor will help with placement for those students who are not currently employed at a child care facility. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2203
3 Credit Hours

Students will become familiar with the laws pertaining to disabled children in child care facilities and special accommodations that child care facilities are required to make according to the Americans with Disabilities Act. Students will also learn how to tailor classroom curriculum to meet the individual needs of each child. Students will become familiar with signs and symptoms of a variety of physical, mental and learning disabilities, their prognosis, treatment, educational implications and expected outcomes. Students will also compare and contrast the pros and cons of integrating special needs children into the regular classroom. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

This course is designed to make the early childhood educator aware of the acquisition of language and how to provide children, birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs, with language rich environments by incorporating the four areas of language: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

This course introduces students to current research in the field of Early Childhood Education. Students will develop a knowledge base of the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct through analyzing case studies designed to demonstrate competencies compatible with current research and practice, development of a professional portfolio to demonstrate competencies in the skills relating to the NAEYC Associate Degree Standards.

1302
2 Credit Hours

Students must be employed or volunteer in a licensed childcare facility to apply the knowledge acquired and skills learned in previous coursework. Observation of the student's work and evaluation of student skills are conducted by instructors following the NAEYC Associate Standards. Students must demonstrate competency in all areas observed and complete a minimum number of clock hours, determined by the institution, of observation and work experience with children birth to five. An emphasis will be on the observation of physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional development in connection with previous courses. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

Students will learn how to develop policies and procedures pertaining to child care facilities based on Arkansas State Licensing Regulations. They will develop a parent handbook, personnel policies, job descriptions and teacher evaluations. Students will design a building blueprint and will create an operating budget and a one-time start up budget. Students will also participate in simulated job interviews and will demonstrate questioning techniques that facilitate answers that provide insight into personalities and attitudes within the statutes of the law. Students will also become familiar with child care software and how to run programs that will monitor student attendance, emergency information and billing. Students will also learn how to use the Arkansas State Voucher Program. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

Students will become familiar with a variety of ways to introduce children, birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs to ideas and concepts related to math and science. Students will create activities; plan and practice developmentally appropriate experiences that would meet recognized standards (NAEYC, NCTM, etc.) for these areas. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2323
3 Credit Hours

This course is based on the foundation of research in child development and focuses on planning and implementing enriching environments with appropriate interactions and activities for young children (birth through 2) including those with special needs, to maximize physical, cognitive, communication, creative language/literacy, and social/emotional growth and development. Competencies are based on Standards developed by the National Associate for the Education of Yong Children for quality early childhood settings. Also covered:  Information on the Quality Approval process and Accreditation for Early Childhood settings in Arkansas, no called Better Beginnings  Arkansas Frameworks Handbook for Infants and Toddlers

This course is based on the foundation of research in child development and focuses on planning and implementing enriching environments with appropriate interactions and activities for young children (ages 0-5 years) including those with special needs, to maximize physical, cognitive, communication, creative, language/literacy, and social/emotional growth and development. Competencies are based on standards developed by the National Association for the Education of Young Children for quality early childhood settings. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course relates principles of child development to appropriate methods of guiding children's behavior for children birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs. Techniques for managing groups of children in the various childcare settings are practiced.

2113
3 Credit Hours

Students will become proficient and certified in CPR and first aid. Students will also become familiar with signs and symptoms of communicable illnesses that pertain to children. Students will become proficient in dealing with emergency situations. Upon completion of the CPR and first aid portion of the course, students will participate in a simulated trauma where they will be required to prioritize and treat injuries until emergency medical personnel arrive. Students will also become familiar with childhood immunizations and how to track them manually and on the computer. Students will also learn how to monitor children’s normal growth patterns and how to identify and seek treatment for abnormalities. In the safety portion of the course, students will become familiar with basic classroom and playground safety issues and how to avoid problems. They will also learn how to inspect playgrounds and identify hazards on playgrounds. Students will design a developmentally appropriate playground and budget that complies with Arkansas Licensing Regulations. Students will also be able to demonstrate proper fire and emergency procedures and will develop evacuation plans that meet Arkansas State Regulations. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the historical roles of families in their child's development. The student will become familiar with the theories supporting early childhood education and learn how to develop an effective program designed uniquely for children (ages birth to eight). The students will also obtain knowledge of state and federal laws pertaining to the care and education of young children. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2323
3 Credit Hours

Analysis of the decision making of individual units of economics: households, business firms, and the government. Topics include price determination, production, income distribution, market structures, and international economics. ECON 2313 and ECON 2323 may not be taken concurrently. ACTS Course Number: ECON 2203. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall and spring semesters.

2313
3 Credit Hours

Analysis of whole economic systems, particularly the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed on analysis of economic problems and their possible solutions. Topics include inflation, unemployment, national income, and the monetary system. ECON 2313 and ECON 2323 may not be taken concurrently. ACTS Course Number: ECON 2103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall and spring semesters.

1303
3 Credit Hours

Introduction to fundamental economic concepts including scarcity, choice, opportunity cost, basic demand and supply and their application involving critical reasoning skills in a market-orientated economic system of organization. Essential Macroeconomic and Microeconomic problems, possible solutions and market implications will be examined. Additional topics include: economic goals and tradeoffs, marginal benefit marginal cost, production possibilities and comparative advantage, unemployment, and inflation. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall semester.

2323
3 Credit Hours

Analysis of the decision making of individual units of economics: households, business firms, and the government. Topics include price determination, production, income distribution, market structures, and international economics. ECON 2313 and ECON 2323 may not be taken concurrently. ACTS Course Number: ECON 2203. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall and spring semesters.

2313
3 Credit Hours

Analysis of whole economic systems, particularly the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed on analysis of economic problems and their possible solutions. Topics include inflation, unemployment, national income, and the monetary system. ECON 2313 and ECON 2323 may not be taken concurrently. ACTS Course Number: ECON 2103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall and spring semesters.

2023
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the teaching profession. Provides a basic understanding of the foundations of the education system in the United States and the role of teachers. Course requires 30 hours of observation and directed experiences in a public school. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course is the study of environmental and hereditary effects on the cognitive, affective, psychomotor and sociolinguistic development of typically and atypically developing elementary grade children of diverse cultural backgrounds within and outside of the United States. The students will be introduced to ways to observe and evaluate children's development and recognize possible delays in development. The students will study major theories of development and learning. Practical application of theory is provided through a variety of hands-on experiences and observations.

2013
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the use of technology for the classroom teacher. Emphasis will be on the computer as an instructional, administrative, and information-gathering tool. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2203
3 Credit Hours

This course will provide future educators with an introduction to educating children with exceptionalities. This course outlines challenges for people with exceptional abilities. Special education law, special education terminology, the evaluation process, and related services for exceptional children will be targeted.

2001
1 Credit Hours

A career in education involves a great deal more than knowledge in a subject matter and provides opportunities other than classroom teaching. Direct experiences with students and a certified teacher in a public school will assist you in deciding whether a career in education is a good choice for you. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2023
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the teaching profession. Provides a basic understanding of the foundations of the education system in the United States and the role of teachers. Course requires 30 hours of observation and directed experiences in a public school. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course is the study of environmental and hereditary effects on the cognitive, affective, psychomotor and sociolinguistic development of typically and atypically developing elementary grade children of diverse cultural backgrounds within and outside of the United States. The students will be introduced to ways to observe and evaluate children's development and recognize possible delays in development. The students will study major theories of development and learning. Practical application of theory is provided through a variety of hands-on experiences and observations.

2013
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the use of technology for the classroom teacher. Emphasis will be on the computer as an instructional, administrative, and information-gathering tool. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2203
3 Credit Hours

This course will provide future educators with an introduction to educating children with exceptionalities. This course outlines challenges for people with exceptional abilities. Special education law, special education terminology, the evaluation process, and related services for exceptional children will be targeted.

2001
1 Credit Hours

A career in education involves a great deal more than knowledge in a subject matter and provides opportunities other than classroom teaching. Direct experiences with students and a certified teacher in a public school will assist you in deciding whether a career in education is a good choice for you. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2404
4 Credit Hours

A continuation of EMS 1301 - Field Internship I. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the Summer semester. This is an internet-assisted course.

1005
5 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to pre-hospital care and the basic legal and ethical aspects involved. Patient Assessment of patients with medical illness, learning signs and symptoms of the different medical problems and their standard of care. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters. This is an internet-assisted course.

1104
4 Credit Hours

EMS systems are overviewed. Emphasis is placed on professionalism, responsibility, development, improvement, and community involvement. The ethical and legal aspects of Emergency Medical Systems including malpractice, consent, and contracts will also be discussed. EMS communications, stress management, and emergency rescue techniques are taught. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester. This is an internet-assisted course.

2204
4 Credit Hours

Etiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, cardiac disease process and assessment of patient with cardiac disorders. ACLS skills and techniques are taught. Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation of cardiac dysrhythmia, clinical signs and symptoms of cardiac conditions, indications and administration of cardiac therapy along with defibrillation and synchronized cardio-version skills. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

Clinical pharmacology, classification, and uses of medications with emphasis on the proper indications, precautions, dosages, and methods of administration will be covered. The course will include dosage calculations and metric conversions. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1303
3 Credit Hours

Supervised rotations through hospital clinical areas. Emphasis will focus on areas that reinforce and allow the paramedic student to apply airway management, IV therapy, and patient assessment skills. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2205
5 Credit Hours

This course will introduce the student to the kinetics of trauma as it relates to the injured patient, also, the signs and symptoms of injury to the body with the standard of treatment for those injuries. The art of extrication and patient triage are a part of this course as it relates to the Pre-hospital setting. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters. This is an internet-assisted course.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course is an overview of the structure and function of the human body. Emphasis is placed on directing, defining, and describing normal and pathological body conditions. Includes a patient assessment by body region and how to communicate effectively with medical control and other members of the health care team. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2103
3 Credit Hours

Management and treatment of traumatic injuries including soft tissue, central nervous system, and musculoskeletal structures, anatomy and pathophysiology, and assessment and management of traumatic injuries involving these human systems. Includes management of all types of burns. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1301
1 Credit Hours

Supervised experience in the pre-hospital care setting in a paramedic ambulance service is covered in this course. This will aid all the paramedic students in an understanding of the Advanced Life Support system. This will provide the student with the opportunity to utilize skills as a team member and progress to function as a team leader under the direct supervision of a paramedic in a field setting. Includes directing activities at the scene, delegating patient care responsibilities, and providing coordination of events from dispatch to the transfer of patient care to the emergency care physician. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester. This is an internet-assisted course.

1003
3 Credit Hours

Hands on applications of skills acquired in EMS 1005 and EMS 2205. This is achieved by working in the hospital emergency room and with an ambulance service. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters. This is an internet-assisted course.

2203
3 Credit Hours

Recognition, management and pathophysiology of patients with medical emergencies. Includes toxicology, drug abuse, alcoholism, infectious diseases, environmental emergencies, geriatrics, pediatrics, behavioral emergencies and crisis intervention. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester. This is an internet-assisted course.

2303
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of EMS 1303 - Clinical Rotation I. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1102
2 Credit Hours

Medical terminology and the metric system are discussed. An overview of general patient assessment, airway and ventilation, and shock are covered. Understanding and management of the body’s system’s reaction to decreased cellular oxygenation are discussed. Body fluids, osmosis and pathophysiology of inadequate tissue perfusion combined with the evaluation and resuscitation of these patients is emphasized. The use of intravenous techniques are taught. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2104
4 Credit Hours

Recognition, management, and pathophysiology of patients with medical emergencies are included in this course. Includes respiratory disorders, diabetic emergencies, nervous systems disorders, acute abdominal pain and renal failure and anaphylaxis. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2402
2 Credit Hours

This course includes etiology and treatment of obstetrical emergencies, the normal and abnormal events associated with pregnancy and childbirth, initial care and resuscitation of the neonate and gynecological emergencies. Emphasis will be on recognizing and managing these events and assisting in abnormal births. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the Summer semester.

2304
4 Credit Hours

This course is designed to further the EMT student’s skills in assisting a paramedic on board and ambulance in the care of the cardiac patient. Also, art of documentation of the patient care forms required by the state of Arkansas from the Pre-hospital provider. Learn the proper communication skills for dealing with hospital staff and other Pre-hospital caregivers. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course serves as an introduction to pre-hospital care. Students will learn how to assess and treat common medical and trauma emergencies that they may encounter. Knowledge gained from this course will allow students to provide direct patient care and stabilization until EMS crews are able to arrive on the scene. This course satisfies requirements set forth by the Arkansas State Fire Training Academy (AFTA). Successful students will receive both certifications from AFTA and the National Fire Training Academy.

2404
4 Credit Hours

A continuation of EMS 1301 - Field Internship I. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the Summer semester. This is an internet-assisted course.

1005
5 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to pre-hospital care and the basic legal and ethical aspects involved. Patient Assessment of patients with medical illness, learning signs and symptoms of the different medical problems and their standard of care. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters. This is an internet-assisted course.

1104
4 Credit Hours

EMS systems are overviewed. Emphasis is placed on professionalism, responsibility, development, improvement, and community involvement. The ethical and legal aspects of Emergency Medical Systems including malpractice, consent, and contracts will also be discussed. EMS communications, stress management, and emergency rescue techniques are taught. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester. This is an internet-assisted course.

2204
4 Credit Hours

Etiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, cardiac disease process and assessment of patient with cardiac disorders. ACLS skills and techniques are taught. Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation of cardiac dysrhythmia, clinical signs and symptoms of cardiac conditions, indications and administration of cardiac therapy along with defibrillation and synchronized cardio-version skills. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1204
4 Credit Hours

Clinical pharmacology, classification, and uses of medications with emphasis on the proper indications, precautions, dosages, and methods of administration will be covered. The course will include dosage calculations and metric conversions. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1303
3 Credit Hours

Supervised rotations through hospital clinical areas. Emphasis will focus on areas that reinforce and allow the paramedic student to apply airway management, IV therapy, and patient assessment skills. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2205
5 Credit Hours

This course will introduce the student to the kinetics of trauma as it relates to the injured patient, also, the signs and symptoms of injury to the body with the standard of treatment for those injuries. The art of extrication and patient triage are a part of this course as it relates to the Pre-hospital setting. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters. This is an internet-assisted course.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course is an overview of the structure and function of the human body. Emphasis is placed on directing, defining, and describing normal and pathological body conditions. Includes a patient assessment by body region and how to communicate effectively with medical control and other members of the health care team. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2103
3 Credit Hours

Management and treatment of traumatic injuries including soft tissue, central nervous system, and musculoskeletal structures, anatomy and pathophysiology, and assessment and management of traumatic injuries involving these human systems. Includes management of all types of burns. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1301
1 Credit Hours

Supervised experience in the pre-hospital care setting in a paramedic ambulance service is covered in this course. This will aid all the paramedic students in an understanding of the Advanced Life Support system. This will provide the student with the opportunity to utilize skills as a team member and progress to function as a team leader under the direct supervision of a paramedic in a field setting. Includes directing activities at the scene, delegating patient care responsibilities, and providing coordination of events from dispatch to the transfer of patient care to the emergency care physician. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester. This is an internet-assisted course.

1003
3 Credit Hours

Hands on applications of skills acquired in EMS 1005 and EMS 2205. This is achieved by working in the hospital emergency room and with an ambulance service. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters. This is an internet-assisted course.

2203
3 Credit Hours

Recognition, management and pathophysiology of patients with medical emergencies. Includes toxicology, drug abuse, alcoholism, infectious diseases, environmental emergencies, geriatrics, pediatrics, behavioral emergencies and crisis intervention. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester. This is an internet-assisted course.

2303
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of EMS 1303 - Clinical Rotation I. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1102
2 Credit Hours

Medical terminology and the metric system are discussed. An overview of general patient assessment, airway and ventilation, and shock are covered. Understanding and management of the body’s system’s reaction to decreased cellular oxygenation are discussed. Body fluids, osmosis and pathophysiology of inadequate tissue perfusion combined with the evaluation and resuscitation of these patients is emphasized. The use of intravenous techniques are taught. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2104
4 Credit Hours

Recognition, management, and pathophysiology of patients with medical emergencies are included in this course. Includes respiratory disorders, diabetic emergencies, nervous systems disorders, acute abdominal pain and renal failure and anaphylaxis. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2402
2 Credit Hours

This course includes etiology and treatment of obstetrical emergencies, the normal and abnormal events associated with pregnancy and childbirth, initial care and resuscitation of the neonate and gynecological emergencies. Emphasis will be on recognizing and managing these events and assisting in abnormal births. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the Summer semester.

2304
4 Credit Hours

This course is designed to further the EMT student’s skills in assisting a paramedic on board and ambulance in the care of the cardiac patient. Also, art of documentation of the patient care forms required by the state of Arkansas from the Pre-hospital provider. Learn the proper communication skills for dealing with hospital staff and other Pre-hospital caregivers. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course serves as an introduction to pre-hospital care. Students will learn how to assess and treat common medical and trauma emergencies that they may encounter. Knowledge gained from this course will allow students to provide direct patient care and stabilization until EMS crews are able to arrive on the scene. This course satisfies requirements set forth by the Arkansas State Fire Training Academy (AFTA). Successful students will receive both certifications from AFTA and the National Fire Training Academy.

2203
3 Credit Hours

An employment internship in an industry appropriate to the curriculum. The experience should be developmental and relate to course work included in the program. An instructor monitors the student’s progress with the supervising employer. The company turns in an evaluation form at the end of the employment period and the student submits a journal and report for grading. (On demand)

2203
3 Credit Hours

An employment internship in an industry appropriate to the curriculum. The experience should be developmental and relate to course work included in the program. An instructor monitors the student’s progress with the supervising employer. The company turns in an evaluation form at the end of the employment period and the student submits a journal and report for grading. (On demand)

1013
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of ENG 1003 with the addition of research papers and literary genres. Prerequisite: ENG 1003. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

A course designed to prepare students to demonstrate a high level of effectiveness in handling the demands of workplace writing and communication. Prerequisite: ENG 1003. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall and spring semesters.

2023
3 Credit Hours

Instruction and practice in writing in creative literary forms including creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Students develop skills in the use of literary devices and techniques as well as methods for inspiring creative thinking and expression. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2013. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

0023
3 Credit Hours

College Literacy is a three hour literacy course designed to be taken concurrently with Freshman English I (ENG 1003) and is for students with ACT English & Reading scores between 15-18 (or ACT equivalent). This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters.

2303
3 Credit Hours

A study of American literature from its beginnings in colonial America through the end of the Civil War, reflecting the major authors, issues, and literary trends of these time periods. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2653. This course is offered online during the fall semester.

1003
3 Credit Hours

Instruction in expository essay form, structure, and style. Prerequisite: ACT scores of 19 or better on reading and English or successful completion of Developmental English and Reading Improvement. Students with ACT scores of 15 – 18 in English and/or reading must take Freshman English I concurrently with College Literacy (ENG 0023) if the above prerequisites are not otherwise met. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 1013. This course is offered on all ASU Beebe campuses and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2613
3 Credit Hours

Survey of form in American folk culture. Includes collection, classification, and analysis of folklore within the context of form. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. This course is offered online during the fall semester.

2003
3 Credit Hours

A study of literature from antiquity through the Renaissance, reflecting the major philosophical, religious, and literary trends of these time periods. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2113. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

0013
3 Credit Hours

A course designed to improve reading comprehension skills and habits through basic reading strategies. The design also includes improving writing skills through basic grammar, in mechanics, in sentence structure, and in paragraph structure. Students with ACT reading and/or English scores below 15 must take this course. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour per week. (Credit earned not applicable toward a degree.) This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2013
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of ENG 2003, from the Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2123. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2623
3 Credit Hours

A survey of world mythologies, including archetype, symbolism, creation, flood, apocalyptic, and afterlife characteristics that cultivate literary interpretive skills. Students will achieve a deeper understanding of mythology as a universal foundation for culture and literature. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. This course is offered online during the spring semester.

2313
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of ENG 2303, from the end of the Civil War to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2663. This course is offered online during the spring semester.

1013
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of ENG 1003 with the addition of research papers and literary genres. Prerequisite: ENG 1003. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 1023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

A course designed to prepare students to demonstrate a high level of effectiveness in handling the demands of workplace writing and communication. Prerequisite: ENG 1003. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2023. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall and spring semesters.

2023
3 Credit Hours

Instruction and practice in writing in creative literary forms including creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Students develop skills in the use of literary devices and techniques as well as methods for inspiring creative thinking and expression. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2013. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

0023
3 Credit Hours

College Literacy is a three hour literacy course designed to be taken concurrently with Freshman English I (ENG 1003) and is for students with ACT English & Reading scores between 15-18 (or ACT equivalent). This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters.

2303
3 Credit Hours

A study of American literature from its beginnings in colonial America through the end of the Civil War, reflecting the major authors, issues, and literary trends of these time periods. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2653. This course is offered online during the fall semester.

1003
3 Credit Hours

Instruction in expository essay form, structure, and style. Prerequisite: ACT scores of 19 or better on reading and English or successful completion of Developmental English and Reading Improvement. Students with ACT scores of 15 – 18 in English and/or reading must take Freshman English I concurrently with College Literacy (ENG 0023) if the above prerequisites are not otherwise met. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 1013. This course is offered on all ASU Beebe campuses and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2613
3 Credit Hours

Survey of form in American folk culture. Includes collection, classification, and analysis of folklore within the context of form. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. This course is offered online during the fall semester.

2093
3 Credit Hours

An employment experience relating to the student's major within the English department. An instructor will monitor the student's progress with the supervising employer. The student will submit a journal logging daily/weekly experiences, a curriculum vitae documenting those experiences, & a digital portfolio of work done during the experience. Plus the student will be evaluated by the employer at the end of the internship. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, pursuing an English/Writing/Communications major, and a 2.00 GPA.

2003
3 Credit Hours

A study of literature from antiquity through the Renaissance, reflecting the major philosophical, religious, and literary trends of these time periods. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2113. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

0013
3 Credit Hours

A course designed to improve reading comprehension skills and habits through basic reading strategies. The design also includes improving writing skills through basic grammar, in mechanics, in sentence structure, and in paragraph structure. Students with ACT reading and/or English scores below 15 must take this course. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour per week. (Credit earned not applicable toward a degree.) This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2013
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of ENG 2003, from the Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2123. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2623
3 Credit Hours

A survey of world mythologies, including archetype, symbolism, creation, flood, apocalyptic, and afterlife characteristics that cultivate literary interpretive skills. Students will achieve a deeper understanding of mythology as a universal foundation for culture and literature. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. This course is offered online during the spring semester.

2313
3 Credit Hours

A continuation of ENG 2303, from the end of the Civil War to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 1013. ACTS Course Number: ENGL 2663. This course is offered online during the spring semester.

A course specifically designed to teach the tools of professional selling and advertising methods to students. Students will learn successful sales techniques for retail and non-retail customers. Students will also learn to develop an advertising program for products and services and the appropriate medium to use.

2033
3 Credit Hours

This course will develop the student’s knowledge of exploiting, determining, evaluating, funding, and implementing strategies for potential entrepreneurial opportunities in the market place and analyzing the feasibility of those opportunities.

1003
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the role of entrepreneurial businesses in the U.S., the impact of the entrepreneurial businesses on the U.S. and global economy, how ideas become businesses, how entrepreneurs operate within a company, and the general precepts of entrepreneurial businesses.

A course specifically designed to teach the tools of professional selling and advertising methods to students. Students will learn successful sales techniques for retail and non-retail customers. Students will also learn to develop an advertising program for products and services and the appropriate medium to use.

2033
3 Credit Hours

This course will develop the student’s knowledge of exploiting, determining, evaluating, funding, and implementing strategies for potential entrepreneurial opportunities in the market place and analyzing the feasibility of those opportunities.

1003
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the role of entrepreneurial businesses in the U.S., the impact of the entrepreneurial businesses on the U.S. and global economy, how ideas become businesses, how entrepreneurs operate within a company, and the general precepts of entrepreneurial businesses.

This is an interdisciplinary study of how things in nature are interconnected. This course is an integrated and science-based study of environmental issues, connections, and solutions. The following concepts are interwoven throughout this course: sustainability, natural capital, natural capital degradation, and solutions to environmental problems. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. This course is offered online during the fall and spring semesters.

2233
3 Credit Hours

An employment experience relating to the student's major within the AS in Environmental Science. An instructor will monitor the student's progress with the supervising employer. The student will submit a journal describing the experience and will be evaluated by the employer at the end of the internship.

This is an interdisciplinary study of how things in nature are interconnected. This course is an integrated and science-based study of environmental issues, connections, and solutions. The following concepts are interwoven throughout this course: sustainability, natural capital, natural capital degradation, and solutions to environmental problems. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. This course is offered online during the fall and spring semesters.

2233
3 Credit Hours

An employment experience relating to the student's major within the AS in Environmental Science. An instructor will monitor the student's progress with the supervising employer. The student will submit a journal describing the experience and will be evaluated by the employer at the end of the internship.

1013
3 Credit Hours

Practical applications of personal financial planning, budgeting, and control. Emphasis in this course is placed on the use of credit, insurance, savings, retirement planning, and housing finance. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1013
3 Credit Hours

Practical applications of personal financial planning, budgeting, and control. Emphasis in this course is placed on the use of credit, insurance, savings, retirement planning, and housing finance. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1013
3 Credit Hours

French I is designed to teach French language and culture as complementary facets of a single reality. Students will learn authentic, not simplified French and use it in the context of actual communication. French I is designed as a foundation course for students who intend to focus on careers based on either a primary or secondary use of the language. There is no prerequisite for French I. ACTS Course Number: FREN 1013. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1023
3 Credit Hours

French II is a continuation of FREN 1013. Prerequisite: FREN 1013 or at least one year of high school French. ACTS Course Number: FREN 1023. This course is offered on student demand.

2013
3 Credit Hours

French III is a continuation of FREN 1023. Prerequisite: FREN 1023 or two years of high school French. ACTS Course Number: FREN 2013. This course is offered on student demand.

2023
3 Credit Hours

French IV is a continuation of FREN 2013 with an introduction to reading French literature. Prerequisite: FREN 2013 or consent of instructor. ACTS Course Number: FREN 2023. This course is on student demand.

1013
3 Credit Hours

French I is designed to teach French language and culture as complementary facets of a single reality. Students will learn authentic, not simplified French and use it in the context of actual communication. French I is designed as a foundation course for students who intend to focus on careers based on either a primary or secondary use of the language. There is no prerequisite for French I. ACTS Course Number: FREN 1013. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1023
3 Credit Hours

French II is a continuation of FREN 1013. Prerequisite: FREN 1013 or at least one year of high school French. ACTS Course Number: FREN 1023. This course is offered on student demand.

2013
3 Credit Hours

French III is a continuation of FREN 1023. Prerequisite: FREN 1023 or two years of high school French. ACTS Course Number: FREN 2013. This course is offered on student demand.

2023
3 Credit Hours

French IV is a continuation of FREN 2013 with an introduction to reading French literature. Prerequisite: FREN 2013 or consent of instructor. ACTS Course Number: FREN 2023. This course is on student demand.

2613
3 Credit Hours

Emphasizes the physical and cultural patterns of the world. ACTS Course Number: GEOG 1103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

This is a course in Geographic Information Systems/Global Positioning Systems using the most current version of Arc View software and state of the art GPS receivers. It provides hands-on training in the operation of the GPS receiver to include data collection and the downloading of data into the ArcView database. It also provides an introduction to databases in general and detailed work with the ArcView database as it relates to data manipulation in the civil drafting field and in other related areas of Geographic Information. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2603
3 Credit Hours

A general survey of geographic regions of the world emphasizing culture, demography, and economic and social patterns. ACTS Course Number: GEOG 2103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester and online during the spring and Summer semesters.

2613
3 Credit Hours

Emphasizes the physical and cultural patterns of the world. ACTS Course Number: GEOG 1103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

This is a course in Geographic Information Systems/Global Positioning Systems using the most current version of Arc View software and state of the art GPS receivers. It provides hands-on training in the operation of the GPS receiver to include data collection and the downloading of data into the ArcView database. It also provides an introduction to databases in general and detailed work with the ArcView database as it relates to data manipulation in the civil drafting field and in other related areas of Geographic Information. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2603
3 Credit Hours

A general survey of geographic regions of the world emphasizing culture, demography, and economic and social patterns. ACTS Course Number: GEOG 2103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester and online during the spring and Summer semesters.

Fundamentals, techniques, and practice of first aid as prescribed by the responding to emergencies course of the American Red Cross. Emphasis is given to programs of accident prevention in school, home, recreation and traffic. Certification may be earned in standard first aid and community CPR (adult, infant, and child) through the American Red Cross. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2513
3 Credit Hours

A study of principles, problems, and practices involved in the improvement of individual and community health. The course is designed to stimulate a greater appreciation and understanding of health for more intelligent self-direction of health behavior and safety awareness. ACTS Course Number: HEAL 1003. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

Fundamentals, techniques, and practice of first aid as prescribed by the responding to emergencies course of the American Red Cross. Emphasis is given to programs of accident prevention in school, home, recreation and traffic. Certification may be earned in standard first aid and community CPR (adult, infant, and child) through the American Red Cross. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2513
3 Credit Hours

A study of principles, problems, and practices involved in the improvement of individual and community health. The course is designed to stimulate a greater appreciation and understanding of health for more intelligent self-direction of health behavior and safety awareness. ACTS Course Number: HEAL 1003. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

This course will give the student a broad overview of common human diseases and the medications used for treatment. The course emphasizes the etiologic factors involved in disease processes and usual approaches to diagnosis and treatment including symptoms, tests, medications, and current therapies. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2303
3 Credit Hours

This course is the study of ICD 10. It includes the assignment of code numbers to diagnoses and procedures. Prerequisites: HIA 1103, Medical Terminology I, HIA 1203, Body Structure and Function. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course is a study of basic medical terminology including diseases, abbreviations, spellings, and diagnostic procedures. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2203
3 Credit Hours

This course teaches medical office software. The software is a database that includes applications of appointment scheduling, posting procedures, insurance billing, and accounts receivable. Prerequisite: HIA 1103 Medical Terminology I. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course is a study of the basic concepts of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The organs and tissues in each body system are studied in detail as well as the interrelationship between the systems. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1603
3 Credit Hours

This course provides instruction of basic skills and guidelines for assigning CPT codes. Prerequisites: HIA 1103 Medical Terminology I, and HIA 1203 Body Structure and Function. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2103
3 Credit Hours

This course is a detailed study of medical terminology that integrates the entire spectrum of information needed by health information managers. This will include anatomical terms, word parts, medical terms, diagnostic terms, surgical terms, and diagnostic procedural terms of each body system. Prerequisite: HIA 1103 Medical Terminology I. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2503
3 Credit Hours

A student’s Internship/OJT assignment will be in an industry/business appropriate to the curriculum. The experience should relate to course work included in the program. An instructor and the coordinator of internship will monitor the student’s progress with the supervising employer. The company will periodically turn in evaluation forms. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required courses and a cumulative 2.0 grade point average. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1303
3 Credit Hours

This course is a study of the management of health records and medical office regulations. Prerequisites: HIA 1103 Medical Terminology I and HIA 1203 Body Structure and Function. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

This course will give the student a broad overview of common human diseases and the medications used for treatment. The course emphasizes the etiologic factors involved in disease processes and usual approaches to diagnosis and treatment including symptoms, tests, medications, and current therapies. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2303
3 Credit Hours

This course is the study of ICD 10. It includes the assignment of code numbers to diagnoses and procedures. Prerequisites: HIA 1103, Medical Terminology I, HIA 1203, Body Structure and Function. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1103
3 Credit Hours

This course is a study of basic medical terminology including diseases, abbreviations, spellings, and diagnostic procedures. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2203
3 Credit Hours

This course teaches medical office software. The software is a database that includes applications of appointment scheduling, posting procedures, insurance billing, and accounts receivable. Prerequisite: HIA 1103 Medical Terminology I. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course is a study of the basic concepts of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The organs and tissues in each body system are studied in detail as well as the interrelationship between the systems. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1603
3 Credit Hours

This course provides instruction of basic skills and guidelines for assigning CPT codes. Prerequisites: HIA 1103 Medical Terminology I, and HIA 1203 Body Structure and Function. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

2103
3 Credit Hours

This course is a detailed study of medical terminology that integrates the entire spectrum of information needed by health information managers. This will include anatomical terms, word parts, medical terms, diagnostic terms, surgical terms, and diagnostic procedural terms of each body system. Prerequisite: HIA 1103 Medical Terminology I. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

2503
3 Credit Hours

A student’s Internship/OJT assignment will be in an industry/business appropriate to the curriculum. The experience should relate to course work included in the program. An instructor and the coordinator of internship will monitor the student’s progress with the supervising employer. The company will periodically turn in evaluation forms. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required courses and a cumulative 2.0 grade point average. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the spring semester.

1303
3 Credit Hours

This course is a study of the management of health records and medical office regulations. Prerequisites: HIA 1103 Medical Terminology I and HIA 1203 Body Structure and Function. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall semester.

1023
3 Credit Hours

A survey of world civilizations from 1660 to present. ACTS Course Number: HIST 1123. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2273
3 Credit Hours

This survey level course will examine the political, economic, religious, and cultural developments of African societies from ancient times to the present. There is no prerequisite for this course; however, students will be expected to have some knowledge of global geography.

2773
3 Credit Hours

A survey of changing social, political and economic policies in the United States from reconstruction to the present. ACTS Course Number: HIST 2123. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

1013
3 Credit Hours

A survey of world civilizations from pre-history to 1660. ACTS Course Number: HIST 1113. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2763
3 Credit Hours

A survey of the development of social, political and economic institutions in the United States from the age of exploration and discovery to reconstruction. ACTS Course Number: HIST 2113. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2283
3 Credit Hours

This course is an in-depth study of American Military History from the colonial times up to the present.

2893
3 Credit Hours

A survey course involving the study of several minority groups in American society from colonial times to the present. The major emphasis will be on African Americans and Native Americans. The course will also examine the contributions of Oriental and Hispanic minorities to the development of American culture.

2093
3 Credit Hours

A survey course on the origins and development of the Russian state and society from ancient times to the present.

2263
3 Credit Hours

A survey of Asian societies from ancient times to the present.

2083
3 Credit Hours

A survey of Arkansas history from the pre-Columbian period to the present. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

1023
3 Credit Hours

A survey of world civilizations from 1660 to present. ACTS Course Number: HIST 1123. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2273
3 Credit Hours

This survey level course will examine the political, economic, religious, and cultural developments of African societies from ancient times to the present. There is no prerequisite for this course; however, students will be expected to have some knowledge of global geography.

2773
3 Credit Hours

A survey of changing social, political and economic policies in the United States from reconstruction to the present. ACTS Course Number: HIST 2123. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

1013
3 Credit Hours

A survey of world civilizations from pre-history to 1660. ACTS Course Number: HIST 1113. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2763
3 Credit Hours

A survey of the development of social, political and economic institutions in the United States from the age of exploration and discovery to reconstruction. ACTS Course Number: HIST 2113. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2283
3 Credit Hours

This course is an in-depth study of American Military History from the colonial times up to the present.

2893
3 Credit Hours

A survey course involving the study of several minority groups in American society from colonial times to the present. The major emphasis will be on African Americans and Native Americans. The course will also examine the contributions of Oriental and Hispanic minorities to the development of American culture.

2093
3 Credit Hours

A survey course on the origins and development of the Russian state and society from ancient times to the present.

2263
3 Credit Hours

A survey of Asian societies from ancient times to the present.

2083
3 Credit Hours

A survey of Arkansas history from the pre-Columbian period to the present. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2204
4 Credit Hours

A survey of the general field of horticulture: growth, fruiting habits, propagation, and culture of horticultural plants. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours per week. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2204
4 Credit Hours

A survey of the general field of horticulture: growth, fruiting habits, propagation, and culture of horticultural plants. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours per week. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

1013
3 Credit Hours

A survey of food service industry to include its history, various food service systems, organization and operations, and franchising. Emphasizes the aspects of sanitation. Passing ServSafe exam will result in certification from the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association.

2013
3 Credit Hours

This course explores the basics about how the lodging industry and the hotels in the industry operate. It includes the history and structure of the lodging industry as well as individual operating departments such as front office, sales and marketing, housekeeping, and maintenance that are so vital to the success of a hotel. Also, it discusses alternative "careers" in the lodging industry.

1023
3 Credit Hours

Focus on the principles, techniques and theories of food production including the introduction, use and selection of equipment for recipes, while applying sanitation for quality, controls and guest accommodations that focus on principles of production. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisite: HA 1013.

The history and development of the hospitality industry that comprises food, lodging, and tourism management, an introduction to management principles and concepts used in the service industry, and career opportunities in the field. The content is geared towards students who have little to no experience in the hospitality industry but who have an interest in exploring and/or pursuing a career in some aspect of hospitality, food service, travel and tourism or related field.

2003
3 Credit Hours

Analysis and development of dining service management skills including leadership behavior, motivation, communication, training, staffing, etiquette, and professional service. Two hours lecture, two hours lab.

2033
3 Credit Hours

This course investigates the principles of cost controls and their application to food and beverage and lodging operations. Emphasis is placed on each step in the flow of costs: purchasing, receiving, storage, issuing, preparation, portioning, service and accounting for sales. Labor costs as they relate to the operations are also discussed. Active problem solving and practical application ensure that students are able to relate the principles learned to the food service and lodging industries. Basic computer applications of cost control systems as well as applied problems in the hospitality industry will also be included. Three hours lecture.

An employment experience relating to the student's major within the Technical Certificate or AAS in Hospitality Administration. An instructor will monitor the student's progress with the supervising employer. The student will submit a journal describing the experience and will be evaluated by the employer at the end of the internship. Prerequisite: a minimum of 6 hours of hospitality or culinary courses.

1013
3 Credit Hours

A survey of food service industry to include its history, various food service systems, organization and operations, and franchising. Emphasizes the aspects of sanitation. Passing ServSafe exam will result in certification from the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association.

2013
3 Credit Hours

This course explores the basics about how the lodging industry and the hotels in the industry operate. It includes the history and structure of the lodging industry as well as individual operating departments such as front office, sales and marketing, housekeeping, and maintenance that are so vital to the success of a hotel. Also, it discusses alternative "careers" in the lodging industry.

1023
3 Credit Hours

Focus on the principles, techniques and theories of food production including the introduction, use and selection of equipment for recipes, while applying sanitation for quality, controls and guest accommodations that focus on principles of production. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisite: HA 1013.

The history and development of the hospitality industry that comprises food, lodging, and tourism management, an introduction to management principles and concepts used in the service industry, and career opportunities in the field. The content is geared towards students who have little to no experience in the hospitality industry but who have an interest in exploring and/or pursuing a career in some aspect of hospitality, food service, travel and tourism or related field.

2003
3 Credit Hours

Analysis and development of dining service management skills including leadership behavior, motivation, communication, training, staffing, etiquette, and professional service. Two hours lecture, two hours lab.

2033
3 Credit Hours

This course investigates the principles of cost controls and their application to food and beverage and lodging operations. Emphasis is placed on each step in the flow of costs: purchasing, receiving, storage, issuing, preparation, portioning, service and accounting for sales. Labor costs as they relate to the operations are also discussed. Active problem solving and practical application ensure that students are able to relate the principles learned to the food service and lodging industries. Basic computer applications of cost control systems as well as applied problems in the hospitality industry will also be included. Three hours lecture.

An employment experience relating to the student's major within the Technical Certificate or AAS in Hospitality Administration. An instructor will monitor the student's progress with the supervising employer. The student will submit a journal describing the experience and will be evaluated by the employer at the end of the internship. Prerequisite: a minimum of 6 hours of hospitality or culinary courses.

This course is a study of the history, literature, arts, and philosophy of the peoples living in Europe and England from the medieval period to the present. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester and online during the fall semester.

This course is a study of the history, literature, arts, and philosophy of ancient cultures, reflecting the major historical, artistic, and philosophical trends of different time periods. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester and online during the spring semester.

This course is a study of the history, literature, arts, and philosophy of the peoples living in Europe and England from the medieval period to the present. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester and online during the fall semester.

This course is a study of the history, literature, arts, and philosophy of ancient cultures, reflecting the major historical, artistic, and philosophical trends of different time periods. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester and online during the spring semester.

This course will continue an introduction to the basics of electronics/electricity. Fundamentals of calculating loads and circuit sizes will be covered. Identification of components and their uses will be covered. Emphasis will be on troubleshooting and diagnostics. The course will consist of 40% theory and 60% related lab. This is the second part of a two-part curriculum. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

This course is an introduction to the basics of electronics/electricity. Fundamentals of calculating loads and circuit sizes will be covered. Identification of components and their uses will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on troubleshooting and diagnostics. The course will consist of 40% theory and 60% related lab. This is the first part of a two-part curriculum. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1204
4 Credit Hours

This course is a study of the principles and components of hydraulic, pneumatic and mechanical power transmission systems. Fluid power (hyd/pne) topics include physical principles, compressors, pumps, actuators, basic valves, circuits, symbols, systems and maintenance. Mechanical topics include gearboxes, pulleys, belts, sprockets, chains, couplers and proper alignment methods. Safety is emphasized.

1104
4 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to electricity and its interaction with conductors, resistors, inductors and capacitors in direct and alternating current circuits. The study includes the use of measuring equipment and calculations to determine resistance, reluctance, impedance, resonance, voltage, current, power, and time constants. Also discussed are magnetism and transformers. In lab exercises, the students learn to use digital and analog multi-meters, frequency counters, signal generators, breadboards, and the oscilloscope. Safety is emphasized.

2104
4 Credit Hours

This course is a study of controllers and the electromechanical interface. Topics include control logic, operator controls, automatic controls, relay logic, signal conditioning, micro controllers, motors, motor drives and sensors. Safety is emphasized.

This course will continue an introduction to the basics of electronics/electricity. Fundamentals of calculating loads and circuit sizes will be covered. Identification of components and their uses will be covered. Emphasis will be on troubleshooting and diagnostics. The course will consist of 40% theory and 60% related lab. This is the second part of a two-part curriculum. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1213
3 Credit Hours

This course reinforces knowledge and skills needed for success in other courses. Emphasis will be placed on using the digital multi-meter and scope meter to test common electrical components.

2303
3 Credit Hours

This course is a study of the systematic methods that should be used when troubleshooting a complex industrial system. Topics include a troubleshooting overview, troubleshooting tools, collecting information, on-line troubleshooting, and specialized tests and equipment. Safety is emphasized.

1304
4 Credit Hours

This course is a study of electrical distribution equipment and wiring methods. Emphasis is placed on safety and the N.E.C. Topics include services, feeders, branch circuits, grounding, over-current protection, ampacity, conduit fill, conductor properties and applications, conduit bending, and enclosures.

This course is an introduction to the basics of electronics/electricity. Fundamentals of calculating loads and circuit sizes will be covered. Identification of components and their uses will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on troubleshooting and diagnostics. The course will consist of 40% theory and 60% related lab. This is the first part of a two-part curriculum. This course is offered on the Searcy campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2023
3 Credit Hours

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of the American legal system, especially as it relates to business. Areas of concentration include contracts, torts, sales, agency, negotiable instruments, and government regulation. ACTS Course Number: BLAW 2003. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2023
3 Credit Hours

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of the American legal system, especially as it relates to business. Areas of concentration include contracts, torts, sales, agency, negotiable instruments, and government regulation. ACTS Course Number: BLAW 2003. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

2153
3 Credit Hours

A course covering the organization and operation of the small business, with emphasis on personal qualifications, small business techniques, capital requirements, forms of organization, location, and sources for assistance. Prerequisites: ACCT 2003 recommended.

2043
3 Credit Hours

A course covering the responsibilities of a first line supervisor; development of techniques and skills in employee communications, decision making, motivation, leadership, and training. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester and online during the fall semester.

2003
3 Credit Hours

Introduction to management techniques and organizational structure. Fundamentals of various approaches to managing: planning; decision making; strategic management; organizing and coordinating work; authority, delegation, and decentralization; organizational design; interpersonal skills; leadership; organizational effectiveness; control methods; and organizational change and development. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall semester.

This course focuses on discussions of the managerial process, examining the managerial functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling and their relation to the daily job of the supervisor.

2153
3 Credit Hours

A course covering the organization and operation of the small business, with emphasis on personal qualifications, small business techniques, capital requirements, forms of organization, location, and sources for assistance. Prerequisites: ACCT 2003 recommended.

2043
3 Credit Hours

A course covering the responsibilities of a first line supervisor; development of techniques and skills in employee communications, decision making, motivation, leadership, and training. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester and online during the fall semester.

2003
3 Credit Hours

Introduction to management techniques and organizational structure. Fundamentals of various approaches to managing: planning; decision making; strategic management; organizing and coordinating work; authority, delegation, and decentralization; organizational design; interpersonal skills; leadership; organizational effectiveness; control methods; and organizational change and development. This course is offered on the Beebe campus and online during the fall semester.

This course focuses on discussions of the managerial process, examining the managerial functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling and their relation to the daily job of the supervisor.

2253
3 Credit Hours

Calculus III

2113
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to theory-based mathematical concepts underlying the traditional computational techniques for elementary school mathematics, using the NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) Principles and Standards, the Common Core State Standards, and the Arkansas Mathematics Standards as a foundation and a guideline. Students will develop reasoning and problem solving skills while exploring the basic idea of sets and set operations, numeration systems emphasizing the base five and the Hindu-Arabic systems, and elementary number theory focusing on the sets of whole numbers and integers. This course may not be used to satisfy general education mathematics requirements. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better or higher level of mathematics. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring and summer semesters.

2215
5 Credit Hours

Calculus II

2123
3 Credit Hours

As a continuation course of MATH 2113 Mathematics for Teachers I, students will develop reasoning and problem solving skills while exploring basic geometry, measurement and conversions, and elementary number theory focusing on the set of real numbers including operations on rational numbers, ratios and proportions, percents, and radical expressions. This course may not be used to satisfy general education mathematics requirements. Prerequisite: MATH 2113 with a grade of “C” or better or higher level of mathematics. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring and summer semesters.

1033
3 Credit Hours

A study of trigonometric functions, identities, basic logarithmic and exponential functions, conic sections, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better. ACTS Course Number: MATH 1203. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1023
3 Credit Hours

A detailed study of functions and their applications including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Topics also include systems of equations and matrices. Prerequisite: Acceptable ACT score or equivalent test score. ACTS Course Number: MATH 1103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

Topics in elementary differential and integral calculus, stressing applications in business and economics. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

Computer-based course that uses online learning software to prepare students for the math skills that are of importance in their specific field of study. Technical Mathematics A, B, M Business Technology Technical Mathematics C, D, E Occupational Technology Technical Mathematics V Veterinary Technology Prerequisite for Tech Math sections A, B, and M: ACT score of 16 or above or Compass score of 22 or above. Prerequisite for Tech Math sections C, D, and E: MATH 0013.(Credit earned not applicable toward an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Science degree.) Students must show mastery for each module, designated by their specific program, from the list below. Module 1: Whole Number and Decimal Number Arithmetic Module 2: Arithmetic of Integers, Exponents, and Order of Operations Module 3: Solve Linear Equations, Formulas, and Applications Module 4: Graph Points and Lines on Cartesian Plane, Find Slope, and Write Equations of Lines Module 5: Exponent Rules and Operations on Polynomials Module 6: Factor Polynomials, Solve Polynomial Equations by Factoring Module 7: Rational Expressions and Equations Module 8: Functions and Graphs Module 9: Systems of Linear Equations Module 10: Linear and Absolute Value Inequalities Module 11: Exponents and Radicals Module 12: Quadratic Functions and Equations Module 13: Ratio, Proportion, Measurement, and Reading Graphs Section A: Modules 1-3 and 13 Section B: Modules 1-6 and 13 Section C: Modules 1-8 and 13 Section D: Modules 1-10 and 13 Section E: Modules 1-13 Section M: Modules 1-3, 13 and Module M, Business Applications Section V: Modules 1-3, 13 and Module for Vet Tech students All students entering into Technical Mathematics for the first time (or after 1 year of not being enrolled in a Foundations of Algebra or Technical Mathematics course) must begin at Module 1; otherwise, students may pick up where they left off in their previous Foundations of Algebra or Technical Mathematics course.

2233
3 Credit Hours

A study of elementary statistics for students in the biological, physical, or social sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better. ACTS Course Number: MATH 2103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2205
5 Credit Hours

C DESCP

1043
3 Credit Hours

Description here

2253
3 Credit Hours

Calculus III

2113
3 Credit Hours

An introduction to theory-based mathematical concepts underlying the traditional computational techniques for elementary school mathematics, using the NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) Principles and Standards, the Common Core State Standards, and the Arkansas Mathematics Standards as a foundation and a guideline. Students will develop reasoning and problem solving skills while exploring the basic idea of sets and set operations, numeration systems emphasizing the base five and the Hindu-Arabic systems, and elementary number theory focusing on the sets of whole numbers and integers. This course may not be used to satisfy general education mathematics requirements. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better or higher level of mathematics. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall, spring and summer semesters.

2215
5 Credit Hours

Calculus II

2123
3 Credit Hours

As a continuation course of MATH 2113 Mathematics for Teachers I, students will develop reasoning and problem solving skills while exploring basic geometry, measurement and conversions, and elementary number theory focusing on the set of real numbers including operations on rational numbers, ratios and proportions, percents, and radical expressions. This course may not be used to satisfy general education mathematics requirements. Prerequisite: MATH 2113 with a grade of “C” or better or higher level of mathematics. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring and summer semesters.

1033
3 Credit Hours

A study of trigonometric functions, identities, basic logarithmic and exponential functions, conic sections, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better. ACTS Course Number: MATH 1203. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1023
3 Credit Hours

A detailed study of functions and their applications including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Topics also include systems of equations and matrices. Prerequisite: Acceptable ACT score or equivalent test score. ACTS Course Number: MATH 1103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters and online during the fall, spring, and Summer semesters.

Topics in elementary differential and integral calculus, stressing applications in business and economics. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

Computer-based course that uses online learning software to prepare students for the math skills that are of importance in their specific field of study. Technical Mathematics A, B, M Business Technology Technical Mathematics C, D, E Occupational Technology Technical Mathematics V Veterinary Technology Prerequisite for Tech Math sections A, B, and M: ACT score of 16 or above or Compass score of 22 or above. Prerequisite for Tech Math sections C, D, and E: MATH 0013.(Credit earned not applicable toward an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Science degree.) Students must show mastery for each module, designated by their specific program, from the list below. Module 1: Whole Number and Decimal Number Arithmetic Module 2: Arithmetic of Integers, Exponents, and Order of Operations Module 3: Solve Linear Equations, Formulas, and Applications Module 4: Graph Points and Lines on Cartesian Plane, Find Slope, and Write Equations of Lines Module 5: Exponent Rules and Operations on Polynomials Module 6: Factor Polynomials, Solve Polynomial Equations by Factoring Module 7: Rational Expressions and Equations Module 8: Functions and Graphs Module 9: Systems of Linear Equations Module 10: Linear and Absolute Value Inequalities Module 11: Exponents and Radicals Module 12: Quadratic Functions and Equations Module 13: Ratio, Proportion, Measurement, and Reading Graphs Section A: Modules 1-3 and 13 Section B: Modules 1-6 and 13 Section C: Modules 1-8 and 13 Section D: Modules 1-10 and 13 Section E: Modules 1-13 Section M: Modules 1-3, 13 and Module M, Business Applications Section V: Modules 1-3, 13 and Module for Vet Tech students All students entering into Technical Mathematics for the first time (or after 1 year of not being enrolled in a Foundations of Algebra or Technical Mathematics course) must begin at Module 1; otherwise, students may pick up where they left off in their previous Foundations of Algebra or Technical Mathematics course.

2233
3 Credit Hours

A study of elementary statistics for students in the biological, physical, or social sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1023 with a grade of “C” or better. ACTS Course Number: MATH 2103. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2205
5 Credit Hours

C DESCP

1043
3 Credit Hours

Description here

2264
4 Credit Hours

Clinical application of the study of chemical substances with emphasis on instrumentation, methodology and interpretation of test results. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2254. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2244
4 Credit Hours

Clinical application of material covered in MLT 2234 with hands-on emphasis on blood counts, white cell differentials, coagulation testing, hematocrit and hemoglobin determinations and red blood cell indices. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week (for a duration of 4 weeks) of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2234. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2284
4 Credit Hours

Clinical application of material covered in MLT 2294 with special emphasis on routine blood typing, cross-matching, serological procedures and antibody detection. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week ( for a duration of 4 weeks) of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2294. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2234
4 Credit Hours

Cellular elements of blood and blood formation are presented. Emphasis will be on blood cell morphology, cell counting, differentiation (normal and abnormal), hematocrit and hemoglobin determinations and red cell indices in both normal and disease states. This course also includes the study of coagulation/hemostasis and statistics. Lecture two hours. Laboratory four hours. Prerequisite: MLT 2223. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course provides an overview of Medical Technology/Clinical Laboratory Science, including historical foundations, healthcare infrastructure, and laboratory safety. An emphasis on medical ethics, medical terminology, basic anatomy and physiology, employment forecasts, laboratory mathematics, as well as the basics of laboratory specimen collection techniques (Phlebotomy) and lab equipment will be introduced. Prerequisites: CHEM 1014 and ZOOL 1014. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring and Summer I semesters.

The theory of antibody and antigen production, function and detection is presented. Included will be the study of the lymphoid system, immunity, autoimmune diseases and complement. Also included are the study and applied techniques of blood typing, cross-matching, antibody and antigen detection and identification. Lecture two hours. Laboratory four hours. Prerequisite: MLT 2264. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2213
3 Credit Hours

The care and use of the microscope are presented. Clinical theory as well as chemical, macroscopic and microscopic analysis of urine and body fluids in normal and disease states are covered. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: MLT 1203 plus additional first year requirements. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the second Summer semester.

2223
3 Credit Hours

The students will become proficient in all phases of proper blood collection. Urinalysis and body fluid analysis for normal and abnormal constituents will be clinically applied. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week (for a duration of 3 weeks) of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2213. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the Summer II semester.

2314
4 Credit Hours

Clinical application of material covered in MLT 2274 with emphasis on identification of microorganisms and correlation to disease states. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2274. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2254
4 Credit Hours

The study of biological macromolecules found in body fluids and their correlation in health and disease is presented. Both theory of chemical procedures and clinical applications as well as instrumentation are included. Routine laboratory mathematics is included in this course. Lecture two hours. Laboratory four hours. Prerequisite: MLT 2244. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2274
4 Credit Hours

The study of morphology and physiology of bacteria, parasites, mycobacteria and fungi is covered. Relation to disease, mode of transmission, medical importance and identification are emphasized. Lecture two hours. Laboratory four hours. Prerequisite: MLT 2264. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2264
4 Credit Hours

Clinical application of the study of chemical substances with emphasis on instrumentation, methodology and interpretation of test results. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2254. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2244
4 Credit Hours

Clinical application of material covered in MLT 2234 with hands-on emphasis on blood counts, white cell differentials, coagulation testing, hematocrit and hemoglobin determinations and red blood cell indices. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week (for a duration of 4 weeks) of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2234. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2284
4 Credit Hours

Clinical application of material covered in MLT 2294 with special emphasis on routine blood typing, cross-matching, serological procedures and antibody detection. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week ( for a duration of 4 weeks) of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2294. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2234
4 Credit Hours

Cellular elements of blood and blood formation are presented. Emphasis will be on blood cell morphology, cell counting, differentiation (normal and abnormal), hematocrit and hemoglobin determinations and red cell indices in both normal and disease states. This course also includes the study of coagulation/hemostasis and statistics. Lecture two hours. Laboratory four hours. Prerequisite: MLT 2223. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1203
3 Credit Hours

This course provides an overview of Medical Technology/Clinical Laboratory Science, including historical foundations, healthcare infrastructure, and laboratory safety. An emphasis on medical ethics, medical terminology, basic anatomy and physiology, employment forecasts, laboratory mathematics, as well as the basics of laboratory specimen collection techniques (Phlebotomy) and lab equipment will be introduced. Prerequisites: CHEM 1014 and ZOOL 1014. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring and Summer I semesters.

The theory of antibody and antigen production, function and detection is presented. Included will be the study of the lymphoid system, immunity, autoimmune diseases and complement. Also included are the study and applied techniques of blood typing, cross-matching, antibody and antigen detection and identification. Lecture two hours. Laboratory four hours. Prerequisite: MLT 2264. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2213
3 Credit Hours

The care and use of the microscope are presented. Clinical theory as well as chemical, macroscopic and microscopic analysis of urine and body fluids in normal and disease states are covered. Lecture two hours. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: MLT 1203 plus additional first year requirements. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the second Summer semester.

2223
3 Credit Hours

The students will become proficient in all phases of proper blood collection. Urinalysis and body fluid analysis for normal and abnormal constituents will be clinically applied. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week (for a duration of 3 weeks) of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2213. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the Summer II semester.

2314
4 Credit Hours

Clinical application of material covered in MLT 2274 with emphasis on identification of microorganisms and correlation to disease states. Students can expect to spend 40 hours per week of clinical time at the affiliate hospital. Prerequisite: MLT 2274. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2254
4 Credit Hours

The study of biological macromolecules found in body fluids and their correlation in health and disease is presented. Both theory of chemical procedures and clinical applications as well as instrumentation are included. Routine laboratory mathematics is included in this course. Lecture two hours. Laboratory four hours. Prerequisite: MLT 2244. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2274
4 Credit Hours

The study of morphology and physiology of bacteria, parasites, mycobacteria and fungi is covered. Relation to disease, mode of transmission, medical importance and identification are emphasized. Lecture two hours. Laboratory four hours. Prerequisite: MLT 2264. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2042
2 Credit Hours

Focuses on self-development guided by knowledge of self and group processes. Challenges current beliefs, knowledge, and skills. Provides equivalent preparation for the ROTC Advanced Course and the Leaders Training Course. Prerequisites: MSL 1011 and MSL 1021. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester

1011
1 Credit Hours

Examines the unique duties and responsibilities of officers. Discusses organization and role of the Army. Reviews basic life skills pertaining to fitness and communication. Analyzes Army values and expected ethical behavior. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1021
1 Credit Hours

Presents fundamental leadership concepts and doctrine. Practices basic skills that underlie effective problem solving. Applies active listening and feedback skills. Examines factors that influence leader and group effectiveness. Examines the officer experience. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2032
2 Credit Hours

Develops knowledge of self, self-confidence and individual leadership skills. Develops problem solving and critical thinking skills. Applies communication, feedback and conflict resolution skills. Prerequisites: MSL 1011 and MSL 1021. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2042
2 Credit Hours

Focuses on self-development guided by knowledge of self and group processes. Challenges current beliefs, knowledge, and skills. Provides equivalent preparation for the ROTC Advanced Course and the Leaders Training Course. Prerequisites: MSL 1011 and MSL 1021. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester

1011
1 Credit Hours

Examines the unique duties and responsibilities of officers. Discusses organization and role of the Army. Reviews basic life skills pertaining to fitness and communication. Analyzes Army values and expected ethical behavior. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1021
1 Credit Hours

Presents fundamental leadership concepts and doctrine. Practices basic skills that underlie effective problem solving. Applies active listening and feedback skills. Examines factors that influence leader and group effectiveness. Examines the officer experience. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the spring semester.

2032
2 Credit Hours

Develops knowledge of self, self-confidence and individual leadership skills. Develops problem solving and critical thinking skills. Applies communication, feedback and conflict resolution skills. Prerequisites: MSL 1011 and MSL 1021. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

This course will cover the principles of mechanical power found in the workplace. Elliptical presses will be used in the training. Gears, chains, bearings, and belts used in mechanical power will be studied. Related safety will be taught.

2003
3 Credit Hours

This course will acquaint students with general principals and skills related to electronics in the workplace. Devices used in controlling electrical circuits will be studied. Wiring of electronic components will be practiced. Related safety will be taught.

2033
3 Credit Hours

The operation of lathes, band saws, and an introduction to CNC will be covered in this course. Students will also learn the fundamentals of cutting and welding metal. Related safety will be taught.

Principles of fluid and pneumatic power will be covered in this course. Basic technology skills needed for the workplace will be practiced. Various controls for fluid and pneumatic power will be used in developing the related workplace skills. Related safety will be taught.

1033
3 Credit Hours

The operation of Mills, drill presses, taps and dies, and metal working hand tools will be learned in this course. The student will learn the basic skills needed in the workplace for metal working. Related safety will be taught.

This course will cover written and printed tolerances for Quality Control and manufacturing. Liner, volume, weight, and fluid measurements will be used. Related safety will be taught.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course will acquaint students with general principals and skills related to electricity in the workplace. Students will learn the basic voltages most used in electricity and their most common uses. Skills in basic electrical wiring will be practiced. Related safety will be taught.

This course will introduce students to processes encountered in manufacturing with emphasis on Quality Control. Measurements with various devices will be taught. G-No Go gauges will be studied. Students will learn various weight measurements and as these relate to volume. Related safety will be taught.

This course will cover the principles of mechanical power found in the workplace. Elliptical presses will be used in the training. Gears, chains, bearings, and belts used in mechanical power will be studied. Related safety will be taught.

2003
3 Credit Hours

This course will acquaint students with general principals and skills related to electronics in the workplace. Devices used in controlling electrical circuits will be studied. Wiring of electronic components will be practiced. Related safety will be taught.

2033
3 Credit Hours

The operation of lathes, band saws, and an introduction to CNC will be covered in this course. Students will also learn the fundamentals of cutting and welding metal. Related safety will be taught.

Principles of fluid and pneumatic power will be covered in this course. Basic technology skills needed for the workplace will be practiced. Various controls for fluid and pneumatic power will be used in developing the related workplace skills. Related safety will be taught.

1033
3 Credit Hours

The operation of Mills, drill presses, taps and dies, and metal working hand tools will be learned in this course. The student will learn the basic skills needed in the workplace for metal working. Related safety will be taught.

This course will cover written and printed tolerances for Quality Control and manufacturing. Liner, volume, weight, and fluid measurements will be used. Related safety will be taught.

1003
3 Credit Hours

This course will acquaint students with general principals and skills related to electricity in the workplace. Students will learn the basic voltages most used in electricity and their most common uses. Skills in basic electrical wiring will be practiced. Related safety will be taught.

This course will introduce students to processes encountered in manufacturing with emphasis on Quality Control. Measurements with various devices will be taught. G-No Go gauges will be studied. Students will learn various weight measurements and as these relate to volume. Related safety will be taught.

1791
1 Credit Hours

Non-music majors as well as music majors may enroll in this course for credit. A performing ensemble designed to study a wide variety of music, The Singers perform on campus as well as before civic organizations. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1102
2 Credit Hours

Applied lessons are met weekly. Students are evaluated at each lesson as to the individual technical and musical progress. The students study a variety of traditional repertoire of classical piano music, covering style periods from the Baroque era through the present day. Repertoire difficulty increases as technical and musical skills increase. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2102
2 Credit Hours

Applied lessons are met weekly. Students are evaluated at each lesson as to the individual technical and musical progress. The students study a variety of traditional repertoire of classical piano music, covering style periods from the Baroque era through the present day. Repertoire difficulty increases as technical and musical skills increase. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2201
1 Credit Hours

A continuation of MUS 1211 Class Piano II. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

1602
2 Credit Hours

Applied guitar students receive private instruction in fundamental and advanced techniques and styles of guitar playing. The lessons focus on acquiring efficient practice habits and developing technical facility. Instruction also includes discussions of style, interpretation and successful performance strategies. Scales, arpeggios, etudes and representative works suited to individual ability will be assigned. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1421
1 Credit Hours

This course is a continuation of Ear Training I. The aural study of intervals, melodies and triads, scales, rhythms and sequences. While further developing those skills acquired in Ear Training I, the course will proceed with an aural study of functional harmony. The purpose is to increase listening skills essential for a musician. Must be taken with Music Theory II or by instructor's consent. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall semester.

2801
1 Credit Hours

Pedagogical knowledge and a basic playing proficiency on the instrument. Topics to be covered include: posture and breathing, tone production (embouchure), holding and hand position, basic fingerings or slide positions, solutions to specific technical problems, articulation, vibrato, tuning procedure, instrument and accessory selection, care and adjustment of the instrument, and general care and maintenance. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2312
2 Credit Hours

Applied lessons are met weekly. Students are evaluated at each lesson as to the individual vocal and musical progress. The students study a variety of traditional repertoire of classical vocal music, covering style periods from the Baroque era through the present day. Repertoire difficulty increases as vocal and musical skills increase. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2791
1 Credit Hours

Continuation of MUS 1891. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1612
2 Credit Hours

Applied guitar students receive private instruction in fundamental and advanced techniques and styles of guitar playing. The lessons focus on acquiring efficient practice habits and developing technical facility. Instruction also includes discussions of style, interpretation and successful performance strategies. Scales, arpeggios, etudes and representative works suited to individual ability will be assigned. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1801
1 Credit Hours

Pedagogical knowledge and a basic playing proficiency on the instrument. Topics to be covered include: posture and breathing, tone production (embouchure), holding and hand position, basic fingerings or slide positions, solutions to specific technical problems, articulation, vibrato, tuning procedure, instrument and accessory selection, care and adjustment of the instrument, and general care and maintenance. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1302
2 Credit Hours

Applied lessons are met weekly. Students are evaluated at each lesson as to the individual vocal and musical progress. The students study a variety of traditional repertoire of classical vocal music, covering style periods from the Baroque era through the present day. Repertoire difficulty increases as vocal and musical skills increase. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

2511
1 Credit Hours

Practice in proper pronunciation of Italian, German, and French language using the International Phonetic Alphabet, applicable to singing art song, oratorio, or operatic literature for music/voice majors. This course is offered on student demand.

2811
1 Credit Hours

Pedagogical knowledge and a basic playing proficiency on the instrument. Topics to be covered include: posture and breathing, tone production (embouchure), holding and hand position, basic fingerings or slide positions, solutions to specific technical problems, articulation, vibrato, tuning procedure, instrument and accessory selection, care and adjustment of the instrument, and general care and maintenance. This course is offered on the Beebe campus during the fall and spring semesters.

1413
3 Credit Hours

Major and minor scales, key signatures, intervals, note values, and meter signatures. Part writing using primary and secondary triads. Failure to pass music entrance examination will require students to take MUS 1403. Music grade of "C" required for advancement in theory sequence. Must be taken concurrently with Ear Training I or by instructor's consent. This course i